35,351 reputation
1584127
bio website example.net
location Germany
age 35
visits member for 5 years, 10 months
seen 6 hours ago

I love being a coder :-)

What's the difference between a coder and a programmer? A programmer is a job description. Everyone can be a programmer, whether he ever learned programming or just taught it himself. A programmer gets paid to write code and as long as the code works, nobody cares how "bad" it might be. He may not even like doing his job, he may only do it for the money.

A coder loves to code. He may work as a programmer or just code as a hobby. A coder cares for the quality of his code and he enjoys every second of writing it. If he can make money with his code, great, if not, no big deal either.


May
1
comment Setting an environment variable before a command in bash not working for second command in a pipe
So simple, yet so elegant. And I like your answer better than the accepted answer, as it will start a sub shell equal to my current one (which may not be bash but could be something else, e.g. dash) and I don't run into any trouble if I must use quotes within the command args (someargs).
Apr
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
29
revised Objective-C categories in static library
Fixed two typos
Apr
25
awarded  Great Question
Apr
24
comment UIImage imageNamed returns nil
That's not because the simulator is less fuzzy but because by default HFS+ (the OS X file system) is case-insensitive. That means it considers aa, AA, aA, and Aa to be the same file. You can format a new HD with HFS+ and decide to make it case-sensitive (Disk Utility gives you that choice) but Macs ship with a pre-formatted HD that is never case-sensitive. Many Mac programmers pay no attention and then their app will break on Macs whose owner re-formatted their HD to be case sensitive; which is possible if you re-install your system from scratch.
Apr
22
comment Best way to make NSRunLoop wait for a flag to be set?
@kernix In most casese you shouldn't use volatile, it will only slow down your code for no benefit. Also no need to use it if you protect access with mutexes, locks or semaphores. The compiler is smart enough to not make assumptions across any of these, that means it always assumes that after a lock was obtained or released, the value of any non-stack variable may have changed and thus automatically rereads it from memory the next time it is accessed.
Apr
22
comment Best way to make NSRunLoop wait for a flag to be set?
@kernix volatile has nothing to do with threading or thread-safety, volatile int x only tells the compiler "whenever I access x, be sure to read it (again) from memory because the value of x might change at any time". If I don't use volatile and write x = 0; while (x == 0); the compiler could make x = 0; while (true); out of it as it sees no code ever changing x, so how could it change and why wasting CPU time for reading the same value over and over again from memory? All that volatile does is disabling some aggressive compiler optimization (which is necessary at times).
Apr
22
comment Best way to make NSRunLoop wait for a flag to be set?
@kernix So if thread A runs a = 5; a++; done = true and thread B reads a as soon as done becomes true, thread B may read a as 6, but it may also read it as 5 (a++ not yet performed) or as any other value (not even a = 5 has been performed yet). Only thread A is guaranteed to read a as 6. To make sure all other threads read a as 6, too, you need a memory barrier (search for that term on Goolge to learn more). Mutexes and locks are memory barriers, performing a selector on a different thread includes such a barrier as well. Thread programming is harder than most people think.
Apr
22
comment Best way to make NSRunLoop wait for a flag to be set?
@kernix Setting a bool across threads is safe by itself meaning it will not have any unexpected side effects, but it is not safe in regards to any other operation, as compilers and CPUs are free to re-arrange operations, perform them out of order or delay their effects (e.g. delay memory writes). a = 5; a++; done = true. What is the value of a when done becomes true? You cannot say, because the CPU may as well perform a++ after setting done to true. It is only guaranteed that a++ is performed before the current thread is reading a again.
Apr
19
comment Best way to make NSRunLoop wait for a flag to be set?
@kernix If you make a while loop as you suggested, it will waste 100% CPU time of a core whenever it waits (which heats up the CPU a lot and also wastes plenty of battery power), thus it is horribly inefficient. And it will also delay page loading dramatically on single core systems, as while the while loop is waiting, it blocks the CPU core and prevents other threads from running on it for some time. In my solution the main thread sleeps most of the time and needs no CPU time at all while waiting, so the core can perform other tasks in the meantime or go into power safe mode.
Apr
12
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
10
comment When should one use a spinlock instead of mutex?
@fumoboy007 Thread A holds the lock and is interrupted. Thread B runs and wants the lock, but cannot get it, so it spins. On a multicore system, Thread A can continue to run on another core while Thread B is still spinning, release the lock, and Thread B can continue within its current time quantum. On a single core system, there is only one core Thread A could run to release the lock and this core is held busy by Thread B spinning. So there is no way the spinlock could ever be released before Thread B exceeded its time quantum and thus all spinning is just a waste of time.
Apr
9
comment When should one use a spinlock instead of mutex?
@fumoboy007 "and it will spin until its time quantum expires" // Which means you waste CPU time/battery power for absolutely nothing w/o any single benefit, which is utterly moronic. And no, I nowhere said that time slicing only happens on single core systems, I said on single core systems there is ONLY time slicing, while there is REAL parallelism om multicore systems (and also time slicing, yet irrelevant for what I wrote in my reply); also you entirely missed the point on what a hybrid spinlock is and why it works well on single and multicore systems.
Apr
8
comment Subclassing UICollectionViewLayout and assign to UICollectionView
return [array copy]; is a memory leak (it creates a new instance that is not autorelease), unless you have ARC enabled. Regardless of ARC, it's totally unnecessary and only wastes memory and CPU time. Just return array, which is autorelease and a mutable array may always be used in place of an immutable one (as long as it is not mutated after that which would be impossible after return)
Apr
3
awarded  Guru
Apr
1
comment How slow are Java exceptions?
@Nate First of all, I said very clearly that all this depends on how exceptions are implemented. I was just testing ONE specific implementation, yet there are plenty and Oracle may choose an entirely different one with every release. Second, if exceptions are only exceptional, what they usually are, of course the impact is smaller, this is so obvious, that I really don't think one has to point it out explicitly and thus I cannot understand your point here at all. And third, exception overuse it bad, everyone agrees on that, so using them with a lot of care is a very good thing.
Mar
31
comment How do you compare structs for equality in C?
@JSalazar Easier for you maybe, but much harder for the compiler and the CPU and thus also much slower. Why do you think compiler add padding in the first place? Certainly not to waste memory for nothing ;)
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
25
awarded  Guru
Mar
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Truncate Cassandra KeySpace using HectorApi and Scala