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seen Dec 21 at 23:01

Dec
3
accepted idiom for padding sequences
Dec
3
comment idiom for padding sequences
Hmm, (first (partition n n (repeat pad) coll)) is actually slightly more verbose, and I doubt it performs better. It's having to unpack with first that bugs me. I was hoping for something really simple, like if take were to have an optional third pad arg: (take 5 (range 10) nil) => (0 1 2 3 4 nil nil nil nil nil) Oh well.
Dec
3
asked idiom for padding sequences
Oct
23
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
16
awarded  Yearling
Aug
16
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
3
comment (list) in lazy-seq causes infinite recursion but (cons) does not
Thanks. I actually did figure out I was misunderstanding the cons/list distinction and what lazy-seq's body should return. I'm curious though why list* is so named when it returns a Cons rather than a PersistentList. Is it possible for the node chain of a PersistentList to end in a sequence? Or can only Cons do that?
Aug
2
revised (list) in lazy-seq causes infinite recursion but (cons) does not
added 20 characters in body
Aug
2
asked (list) in lazy-seq causes infinite recursion but (cons) does not
Aug
1
comment Why clojure collections don't implement ISeq interface directly?
The only rational I can fathom is that the rest method of an ISeq is intended to always return the same concrete type. If that's not the case, though, I'm not hearing any good reason why vectors and maps shouldn't be sequences directly.
Aug
1
comment Why clojure collections don't implement ISeq interface directly?
These are all good arguments for having a general sequence interface with many implementations serving different performance scenarios. So fine: rest on a vector should not return a vector. But why can't vector itself be an ISeq whose rest operation returns the same as (rest (seq myvector))?
Jul
18
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
28
awarded  Taxonomist
May
15
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
17
comment How should I create I/O types (e.g. File) at runtime when using Dependency Injection
You're right this is a language problem: what I really want is a convenient, concise way to create boilerplate abstract factories.
Apr
17
accepted How should I create I/O types (e.g. File) at runtime when using Dependency Injection
Apr
17
comment How should I create I/O types (e.g. File) at runtime when using Dependency Injection
Thanks. I think I found the answer: better for classes to give as specific information as possible about their dependencies. Abstract Factories aren't totally specific, but they're much more specific than an Injector. This may not matter for code that stays within a single program written by one or two people, but using the injector as a service locator (even if just for i/o types) would be terrible for any external consumers of the classes.
Apr
17
comment Which dependencies should I inject?
Inject all injectables, new all newables. Without this distinction, DI would require all objects living for the full duration of the program. Newables, aka value types, represent inert data and optionally some associated transformative behaviors (i.e. methods that take in values and return new values). Injectables, aka service/business types, represent functionality and optionally some associated program state. Arguably, we also have I/O types to represent external state, e.g. File(). I/O types must be newable but should be created through abstract factories so they can be mocked for test.
Apr
16
asked How should I create I/O types (e.g. File) at runtime when using Dependency Injection