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14h
comment Is the term “method” defined by the C++ Standard?
@GiulioFranco - in Java, a final method is still a method.
19h
comment What's the purpose of function with only unspecified number of parameters?
You may know from some other source what the actual argument types are.
1d
answered The consequences and pros/cons of flushing the stream in c++
2d
comment Why can't constructors deduce template arguments?
Well done, reminding people that a template is not a type. (I originally used "+1" instead of the first two words, but apparently that's not allowed)
Apr
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
1
comment Does C and C++ guarantee the ASCII of [a-f] and [A-F] characters?
@Boann - better to not fail at all. Write portable code.
Mar
30
comment Confusing sizeof(char) by ISO/IEC in different character set encoding like UTF-16
@kembedded - that's almost right. I may be seeing a language issue here rather than a technical issue, but in "in case I use UTF-8" should be "in case the compiler uses UTF-8". It's not a matter of what the programmer does, but of what the compiler writers decided to do.
Mar
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
7
comment What is meant by the most restrictive type in C?
@BsD - that gives you the largest type. It may or may not be the most restrictive.
Mar
6
answered Is it mandatory to escape tabulator characters in C and C++?
Feb
19
comment Why no short overloads for std::to_string? Why no noexcept?
@goneskiing - the code that GCC is complaining about is valid and its meaning is well defined. Keeping up with compiler writers' notions of good coding style is an endless slog.
Feb
18
answered Why are floating point infinities, unlike NaNs, equal?
Feb
17
comment Why does ostream::write() require ‘const char_type*’ instead of ‘const void*’ in C++?
Talking about the imaginary language "C/C++" is often not helpful, especially when the difference between C and C++ is being examined.
Feb
10
comment Why does string support `operator=(char)`?
Two things. First, std::string was not imported from an existing library. It was designed specifically for the C++ standard library. Second, deprecated does not mean that something will go away (shortly or otherwise). It means only that it might go away. For example, the C standard headers are part of C++, but deprecated. They're never going to go away. (And, of course, they shouldn't be deprecated, but that's another matter)
Feb
5
comment exception with non virtual destructor c++
And, just for completeness, deleting a pointer to a derived object through a pointer to the base type, when the base type does not have a virtual destructor, produces undefined behavior. It might run the base destructor, but it might do something completely different.
Dec
31
comment If a 32-bit integer overflows, can we use a 40-bit structure instead of a 64-bit long one?
It might be better to use uint_least32_t and int_least8_t here, rather than unsigned int and char. unsigned int is only required to be at least 16 bits. char will always be at least 8 bits, so there's not as much of an issue there. Also, I'd use multiplication instead of bit shifting for the hi part of the value; that's well defined, and the compiler can substitute bit shifting if that's appropriate. Other than that, good idea!
Dec
17
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
15
comment Maximum Stack Size for C/C+ Program?
On many embedded processors the stack is sixteen words.
Dec
14
comment What kind of optimization does const offer in C/C++?
C and C++ are two different languages with a common heritage. While comments about the non-existent hybrid "C/C++" might provide some insight, focusing on one or the other will be much more meaningful.
Dec
9
awarded  string