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2h
comment Why is x[0] != x[0][0] != x[0][0][0]?
@MattMcNabb - this is engineering, not intuition. If you're guessing about how arrays work then you shouldn't be using them.
1d
comment Why is x[0] != x[0][0] != x[0][0][0]?
If you have to fight with pointers the definition is too complicated. typedef int *ptr; typedef ptr arr[5]; arr *x;
Jul
1
comment Using move semantics for a cast operator
This is a conversion operator. There is no such thing as a cast operator. A cast is something you write in your code to request a conversion, but it is not the only way to get a conversion.
Jun
16
revised Header file included only once in entire program?
added 47 characters in body
Jun
14
comment Does comma separators in type definition in C guarantee the order?
The point is that this hand-waving argument leads to erroneous conclusions, so cannot be correct.
Jun
13
comment Does comma separators in type definition in C guarantee the order?
This incorrectly suggests that f(i, i++) has well-defined behavior.
Jun
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
9
comment Why JVM is designed in a way that it does not allow force Garbage Collection?
@StephenC - smart pointers are a form of automatic memory management, but they are not garbage collection.
Jun
7
comment Why JVM is designed in a way that it does not allow force Garbage Collection?
Gosh, and here I thought that the garbage collectors that have been implemented for C++ actually worked! <g> That aside, garbage collection does not mean that you can ignore memory management. It's easy enough to create memory leaks in Java.
May
29
awarded  Nice Answer
May
23
comment Why are unsigned integers error prone?
@PJTraill - peace.
May
23
comment Why are unsigned integers error prone?
@PJTraill - you really aren't doing the OP a service by pulling this thread down a rathole.
May
23
comment Why are unsigned integers error prone?
@PJTraill - the rule is the same in C: the code is valid and well-defined. Sure, it would be possible to require the compiler to generate more code for mixed comparisons, but that goes against the fundamental design principle of C and C++. If you want big and slow, program in C#.
May
22
comment Why are unsigned integers error prone?
@example - your compiler must let you do this; the code is well formed and its meaning is well defined. Granted, a warning may help spot the logic error, but that's not the compiler's primary responsibility.
May
20
comment Is this parenthesis-free C preprocessor definition safe?
@supercat - (((a*b)+(c*d))-(e*f)) compels me to sort out what those lousy infernal stupid parentheses mean. If I wanted to do that I'd program in LISP. While it's true that redundant parentheses are occasionally helpful, in many of the code examples I've seen on stack overflow they are just clutter.
May
20
comment Is this parenthesis-free C preprocessor definition safe?
Agreed, except that it's not mild. Far too much code these days has redundant parentheses, apparently because whoever wrote it didn't know the language well enough to write clearly.
May
18
awarded  Enlightened
May
18
awarded  Nice Answer
May
13
awarded  Nice Answer
May
11
comment Function return value defined as a constant
A function is marked const with an attribute (e.g., void f() __attribute__((const)) { ... }, not with a const keyword on its return type.