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Feb
2
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
With the bounty about to expire, I am awarding it to the highest-upvoted answer posted before the bounty. While some of the answers posted during the bounty period do add insight into the problem, they show a lack of understanding of the subject matter, and especially of existing implementations of cycle breakers. The question is of course still open; if a good answer comes along, I will gladly accept it.
Feb
2
awarded  Benefactor
Feb
2
answered How to persist a function pointer in C?
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
1
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
What you are saying is refuted by the existing implementations, which are using pure reference counting and occasionally invoke the cycle breaker independently of the refcounting primitives. As I said, all the metainformation is in the control block, and (their equivalent of) shared_ptr is no more expensive than without the cycle breaker. Since I have explained all this before, and we are now running in circles (if you excuse the pun), I will end my side of this part of the discussion here. If you are genuinely interested about this approach, feel free to look into Python's cycle collector.
Feb
1
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
The answer is incorrect in that it claims that additional data would have to be on shared_ptr, or that its copying etc would become slower - none of that is the case, the additional data (consisting of three pointers in the Python case) is in the control block, and is opt-in. The DFS you refer to is just performed by a library function, which bears little resemblance to how managed languages work.
Jan
31
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
That's exactly the point: in Python, the crucial information - a list of referents - is provided by a method on the type, not by an all-knowing "managing" VM. The same could be done for shared_ptr, and in fact the same is already done to invoke the type's destructor.
Jan
31
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
You answered neither question, for the simple reason that there is no "managing" magic that python does behind the scenes. It's raw pointers and reference counting all the way down.
Jan
31
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
I am not sure what you mean by managed here. How are PyObjects any more "managed" than the objects owned by shared_ptr?
Jan
31
revised how to run python script with os.fork on windows?
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Jan
31
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
Take a look at those implementations, and you will see that they are not managed. Nothing prevents Python objects created by C extensions from e.g. using pointer masking, or referring to non-Python objects, and still participating in gc. (The gui toolkit wrappers do this regularly.)
Jan
30
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
Existing implementations don't require a registry of who is referring to your object, they make do with objects enumerating who they refer to. (They ask the type to provide the information, so no help from the compiler or VM is needed.)
Jan
30
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
@S.K. I see your point. Given previous StackOverflow questions about the topic, I would argue that using weak_ptr to break cycles is more error-prone than usually acknowledged. Also, the failure mode is silent leaks (of memory or, worse, other resources), which gives off a bad design smell, akin to the design smell of using raw pointers where one had to remember to delete it lest the code leaks.
Jan
30
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
@0kcats The additional metadata, such as pointers to prev/next container object, is only in the control block, and then only for types that opt-in to the functionality. You wouldn't pay for what you don't use. (This is how existing implementations work as well, except they use intrusive reference counting which conflates the object and the control block.)
Jan
30
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
Existing cycle breaker implementations are not managed in the Java sense. (True managed-VM systems tend not to use reference counting to begin with.) In CPython, both the core interpreter and especially the C extensions create objects that are not managed by a "VM" (except for allocation/deallocation through an agreed-upon reference counting scheme akin to an intrusive version of shared_ptr). The cycle breaker works by having the types that take part in it cooperate. This sounds implementable in C++ in principle, but the fact that it wasn't implemented is what prompted the question.
Jan
29
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
Another possible problem is the scope of the cleanup. Since shared_ptr and the objects they manage exist outside of an explicit context, a cleanup would need to be global. That does not sound like C++, as very few things in C++ are global - the heap managed by new and delete is the only one that comes to mind.
Jan
29
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
Deferred destruction is always a problem, but with current shared_ptr, you get no destruction for cycles. The option of explicit cleanup seems better than having no cleanup whatsoever. I agree that the choice of when to run cleanup is a problem in practice, especially given that it is hard to predict the time it takes to run it.
Jan
29
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
The rest of answer does not draw its content from those references. The quoted paragraph assumes that the cycle breaker will directly invoke an object's destructor, which is not how the modern designs work - it is the object itself that breaks the cycle, when prompted by the collector. (Analogous misconceptions about the design and the "breaking of encapsulation" that follows from them are repeated throughout your answer.)
Jan
29
comment Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
That's a valid point, a completely automatic cycle breaker invoked on every shared_ptr destruction would be slow. But did you consider a cycle breaker that needs to be invoked manually? (This is mentioned in the question.) I don't see why that would result in non-deterministic behavior.
Jan
28
revised Feasibility of automatic cycle breaker for `std::shared_ptr`
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