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I'm a hobbyist programmer interested in algorithms, data structures, complexity theory and computational geometry.


1d
comment Is it possible to remove from an indexed data structure and avoid shifting at the same time?
It might be better to think of it as k rows, each a linked list with at most k columns, where k is O(sqrt(N)). You then just have to ensure the linked lists stay O(sqrt(N)) in size and maintain the index number of the first (and perhaps last) element. With 16 elements you would have something like this: ((0,3),(4,7),(8,11),(12,15)). If you wanted say element 9, well 9 is in the interval (8,11) (found via binary search), zero-indexed row 2, and that it is the second element in row 2.
1d
comment Is it possible to remove from an indexed data structure and avoid shifting at the same time?
What all do you need to the data structure to be able to do? A simple approach allows for O(sqrt(N)) performance (break the size N array into k arrays of at most k elements), though using balanced binary trees (along the lines of a segment tree) allow for O(log N) performance but is somewhat more complicated.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
22
comment Why can't we use O-Notation to compare algorithms?
In the example listed, all Big-O notation tells you is that at some point A1 grows faster than A2, making A2 the better choice. It doesn't tell you when that point is. It's when you don't take this into account that comparisons become a problem. There's a few algorithms that have exceptionally Big O's, but the hidden constants are so high as to make the algorithms impractical in practice for all but the most ridiculously large problem sizes.
Sep
21
comment Optimal algorithm to lose game 2048
It seems rather unlikely that you can avoid getting an 8 unless you allow for ideal tile placement (rather than random). Otherwise it seems like it's far more likely that random tile placement will restrict your movements to two movement directions, at which point it becomes likely that the final two directions will be cutoff as well.
Sep
21
comment How to find Longest path in graph
+1: "Theoretical CS has abandoned you; you need to turn to practical engineering instead." I'll have to remember that one, a rather interesting way of putting things.
Sep
19
comment Build number with addition and multiplication
If the problem you are trying to solve is the same as Google Translate tells me of this github found via copying a section of the examples and using Google, then it looks like O(2^N) is probably the best you can hope for and as noted in the comments, memoization (along with Dynamic programming) seems to be the way to go.
Sep
19
comment Build number with addition and multiplication
The case where only addition allowed and an exact match is possible is exactly the same as subset sum, which is known to be NP-Complete. It seems like allowing multiplication would probably make it harder, not easier to solve. I suspect there is a O(2^N) algorithm using dynamic programming. Also, the numbers being prime is rather unlikely to help. How long are the sequences? How much time/space are you allowed? Is a desired time/space complexity listed?
Sep
18
comment How do I further optimize this Data Structure?
+1: The DLL provides the insertion order required by the pop() function.
Sep
17
comment How to store phone numbers using BITMAP?
Fair point, though how well it works depends on the data. If the intended data structure is a bitmap then it's unlikely to be limited to a small enough area, from which the phone numbers are gathered, to allow for much compression using the area codes. "In use" wording makes me think that either area codes can be ignored completely (all numbers are of the same area code) or there are enough variety in the area codes to have little or no benefits from area codes as you'd need to know all phone numbers in use with a given area code to determine if the number is not in use.
Sep
17
comment if something is little o of f(n) is it also big O of f(n)?
+1: Though as mentioned it might be good to state explicitly that while little-oh implies big-oh, big-oh does not imply little-oh.
Sep
17
comment How to store phone numbers using BITMAP?
Ah, I see. If you are going to mention a data structure it's probably wise idea to have some understanding of what it is. Though understanding it doesn't exactly mean you know how to code it offhand. Also, now I review the Wikipedia article I'm reminded that a compressed trie generally gets more space efficient as the number of used or unused elements decreases, making a compressed trie a less than ideal choice in this situation because there likely wouldn't be much compression that could be done. This might be what the interviewer may have been trying to get you to see by coding it.
Sep
16
comment What does O(O(f(n))) mean?
+1: I'm guessing it's intended to be a trick question.
Sep
16
revised How to store phone numbers using BITMAP?
added 616 characters in body
Sep
16
answered How to store phone numbers using BITMAP?
Aug
21
comment Finding the index of an item in a list of lists
It only looks ugly because I only gave the result of what I had in mind. Added the for-loop (I'd be interested to see it done as a one-liner). Also added a note about using an interval tree.
Aug
21
revised Finding the index of an item in a list of lists
added 586 characters in body
Aug
21
answered Finding the index of an item in a list of lists
Aug
21
answered Rolling polygon
Aug
20
revised Advice for algorithm choice
deleted 83 characters in body