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Aug
25
comment Does D have something akin to C++0x's move semantics?
@user3728501 As far as postblit efficiency goes, yes, it could be slightly less efficient to do a shallow copy and then deep copy specific members, but you're talking about reassigning one pointer when you're allocating memory to do a deep copy, so that cost is dwarfed by the deep copy. The main benefit is that you don't have to copy each member explicitly like in C++. So, it reduces the amount of code and helps with correctness. The major downside is that it doesn't currently work with const or immutable, since the posblit mutates member variables. Most structs don't have postblits though.
Aug
25
comment Does D have something akin to C++0x's move semantics?
@user3728501 I don't know what else to say about paragraph 3. Copying a class object is just copying a reference. So, it's basically the same as copying a pointer. Copying a struct which is a reference type (e.g. it just contains a pointer) would then be the same or perhaps slightly more expensive if it involves ref counting. D containers are reference types (be they structs or classes), so copying them around is cheap. C++ on the other hand makes it so that its containers are value types, so passing them around results in deep copies, which is expensive.
Aug
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
9
revised Where is Date roll is useful?
added 1 character in body
Aug
6
comment Where is Date roll is useful?
@user1432751 I don't know what you're even trying to do there. I am not particularly familiar with C#'s DateTime, and your example is not clear. I've looked at C#'s DateTime before but not recently, I don't think that I've ever used it, since I've barely ever used C#. D's SysTime and DateTime's add and += return their this by ref, so you can chain those calls if you want to. You can also chain + calls, though that would result in a new object rather than mutating an existing one. There are no const variants of add which return a new object if that's what you're looking for.
Aug
2
answered Where is Date roll is useful?
Aug
2
comment Where is Date roll is useful?
If you specifically wanted += to be done in the local time zone, you'd have to convert the SysTime to DateTime, add to it, and then convert back, which is awkward, but really, SysTime was designed to avoid having DST issues screw with time operations, and you really don't want to take DST into account like that normally. I supposed that add could be extended to add units smaller than months and take the time zone into account, but I expect that that would lead to a lot of accidental misuse for folks who really wanted += but didn't understand.
Aug
2
comment Where is Date roll is useful?
Because of the rollover, add!"years" and add!"months" does take the time zone into account, but += does not. It only deals with the time in UTC. So, yes, if you hit a DST transition and you were expecting it to take the time zone into account, then that might throw you off slightly, but it's adding the actual amount of time that's passed (in hnsecs), not explicitly incrementing the day or the hour or whatnot. roll on the other hand does take the time zone into account, because it's specifically operating on the units. And yes, it's there for spin widgets for date pickers.
Jul
21
revised passing array by reference in D
added 78 characters in body
Jul
21
answered passing array by reference in D
Jul
21
comment passing array by reference in D
It would be easier to help you if you have provided the code that you were compiling with. What you have here wouldn't compile even if what you were trying to do were correct, since you used ... in the array definitions, and you called M outside of any function and with arguments that don't exist.
Jul
20
comment Escaping from “inout hell”
@Meta Yes, a way to forward constness would be useful, but exactly how that should work becomes an interesting question. It's been discussed before but not yet gone anywhere. Fortunately, it really only comes up when wrapping types, and that happens primarily with ranges, and ranges and` const` interact badly enough that the lack of const on functions like front and empty hasn't really mattered.
Jul
20
comment Escaping from “inout hell”
@Meta If const is going to be forwarded, it needs to be tested for with static if, and the functions in question need to be duplicated. Some of Phobos does that, but far too often, the constness simply isn't forwarded. But most of the places in Phobos where it would apply would be ranges, and const ranges are useless, so forwarding the constness of functions like front or empty doesn't really do much for you anyway. It's possible to make const ranges work by making it so that save returns a tail-const variant of the range, but it's a pain, and Phobos doesn't do it currently.
Jul
20
answered Escaping from “inout hell”
Jul
20
comment Escaping from “inout hell”
@Meta All inout is for is making it so that you can make the constness of the return type match that of a parameter without resorting to templates (since with const, you lose the constness of the parameter and just always get const for the return type). Within the function, inout is basically the same as const with all of the restrictions that come with it. So, it's pointless to make a function inout unless you're trying to affect the return type. There is no way to make it so that you can call a mutable function on an object that is not mutable.
Jul
15
comment Why is this subclass' parent method call not polymorphic?
It's plenty useful. You just have to understand how to use it, and you misunderstood how it worked. You just need to override the function instead of the member variable, and it works fine. The code length isn't even much different. And if you want to override a member variable instead, just wrap it in a function to return its value and use the function instead of using the variable directly. But I've never heard of a language that overloaded variables, and given how polymorphism works underneath the hood, it would pretty much mean wrapping them in functions underneath the hood anyway.
Jul
14
comment is expression ignores immutable/const?
The compiler does do several special things with arrays and templates (like strip the outer layer of const, since it knows that the array is going to be sliced when it's passed in), so when the compiler is inferring the type of T with T[], it's much more likely to surprise you than if you just use T. It's ultimately more user-friendly the way that it is (e.g. it was very annoying when that outer layer of const wasn't stripped), so we're better off for it, but it can be surprising at times.
Jul
1
comment DLang - Template constraints - type must implement interface
@DejanLekic Perhaps, but they only work in very simply cases. In particular, they won't work with anything involving ranges, so inevitably, you end up having to use template constraints anyway in most cases, and after using them that much, they really don't seem ugly to me anymore. And unfortunately, template specializations have slightly different semantics than template constraints do even for the same thing (: doesn't quite mean implicit conversion for template specializations), and I'm likely to have to look up and/or test template specializations to know quite what they're doing.
Jul
1
comment DLang - Template constraints - type must implement interface
Actually, it does match structs and classes which have an alias this which converts to an IComponent (I just tried it to make sure). So, it really isn't any different from using a template constraint in this case. It's just slightly shorter. Personally, I tend to forget that template specializations like this exist in D, because template constraints are far more powerful, and you often need that extra power. So, template specializations frequently don't work, and they're a redundant feature (but template specializations came first, which is why we have both).
Jun
30
answered DLang - Template constraints - type must implement interface