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6h
revised a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
added 4 characters in body
6h
comment a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
If all you're dealing with is arrays, then save is pointless. It'll just return a slice of the same array. However, in the case of general forward ranges, it's quite important, because save results in a slice of the range - it refers to the same elements, but altering the range itself doesn't alter the original - and simply assigning the range to a new variable doesn't necessarily do that. It depends on how the range is implemented. So, save is necessary for generic range-based code (and most range-based code should be generic).
1d
answered a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
Aug
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
19
comment D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?
@DavidEränen Well, you're using const Array!T if you're using opIndex inside of a const function of a struct or class that it's a member of, but if all you're trying to do is use opIndex rather than using it as const in general, it looks like it can easily be made to work. Feel free to open an enhancement request issues.dlang.org or even to create a pull request if you're feeling brave github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos . It looks like more work probably should be done on making Array const-correct though, even if we can't make it completely const-correct.
Aug
19
revised D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?
deleted 1 character in body
Aug
18
answered D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?
Aug
18
comment Debugging memory usage in D
Well, I find it very hard to believe that you have an actual memory leak if you're using GC-allocated memory (though it's not necessarily impossible). What's more likely is that the GC is having a problem with false pointers and thinks that some of the memory that you're using holds pointers to memory which should be ready be collected, and so it won't collect it. That's much more likely on 32-bit systems than 64-bit systems, though with 6+GB of RAM, I'd expect you to be on 64-bit. Regardless, it would be a lot easier to help you if we had some sample code to look at and test out.
Aug
15
comment Debugging memory usage in D
Are you sure that you're actually leaking memory? Depending on what you're doing, you could accidentally holding on to references, making it so that the GC can't free that memory, which could lead the memory increasing like that if you're doing a lot of allocations.
Aug
10
revised Why are overloaded member functions only inherited automatically if none of them are overriden, in D?
added 2 characters in body
Aug
8
answered Why are overloaded member functions only inherited automatically if none of them are overriden, in D?
Aug
5
comment Representing optional values in D
@Meta It doesn't throw an exception. It asserts. But yes, it will check whether the Nullable!T is "null" when you try and use it as a T.
Jul
9
answered What's D's “out” storage class useful for?
Jul
3
answered How do I declare a private class member in D?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
2
awarded  d
Jul
1
answered writefln() throws: Incorrect format specifier: %(%s, %)
Jul
1
comment sizeof in D language
@AdamD.Ruppe Technically, I don't think that there is an official ABI for dynamic arrays. As I understand it, they don't even technically have to be implemented with ptr and length. They could be implemented as begin and end pointers so long as the properties ptr and length exist (though they'd be property functions in that case). But realistically, at this point, they're going to be implemented with ptr and length members. It might be worth actually specifying that (and their order) in the spec, but I don't know what the tradeoffs are for specifying it or not specifying it.
Jun
30
answered sizeof in D language
Jun
24
answered Most concise way to extract file name extension