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Nov
7
awarded  Great Answer
Oct
9
answered Phobos library function for converting a uint to binary string
Oct
9
comment Phobos library function for converting a uint to binary string
So, you want to convert an integer to a base 2 value as a string?
Oct
9
comment Phobos library function for converting a uint to binary string
Please clarify what you mean by converting an integer to a binary string. Are you looking to convert 22 to "22", or do you mean some other type of conversion?
Oct
9
comment How to convert a number to a UTF8 char?
@eco Well, the situation is pretty much identical with C++ in that regard except that in D we assume that it's a UTF-8 code unit, whereas in C++ it's not assumed to be Unicode. But regardless, the misunderstanding is basic enough that I think that it merits studying the basics of the language a lot more thoroughly, since if you don't know even know what char really is, who knows what other basic misunderstandings you might have.
Oct
8
comment How to convert a number to a UTF8 char?
@user3661500 Well, if you're getting confused by basic stuff like that, I'd suggest that you read this book on D: ddili.org/ders/d.en/index.html
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
26
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
26
comment Const member function vs const return type
@DejanLekic I tend to agree, but there are a number of cases where the compiler ignores attributes by design (the argument for it usually has to do with either generic code or when a large section of a file is marked with the attribute at once via a label or block). IIRC, there's at least one open bug on the topic, but I don't know if it will be changed or not.
Sep
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
4
comment Concurrency in a D program
Yeah. More details are needed to help you very well, particularly since your code fails to compile as-is. And there really isn't any semantic difference between options 1 and 2. There can be depending on what the imports are or what the member functions for reader are, but in almost all cases, they're the same. If reader has a send member function, then option 1 would call that instead of a free function, whereas option 2 would always call a free function, but the compiler will turn option 1 into option 2 if reader doesn't have a member function called send.
Aug
28
comment D: Adding elements to array without copying
@AmirAbiri More or less, yes. Passing an array around results in arrays that point to the same memory but which aren't references to one another, so if one of them has to reallocate, then it won't refer to the same memory as the others anymore. So, if you're not appending after passing it around, passing it around is fine, but if you are, then you need to either pass it around by ref or use another solution (like Array). And Appender makes appending more efficient, so if you're constructing an array via a lot of appending (rather than just appending a few times), it's best to use it.
Aug
27
answered D: Adding elements to array without copying
Aug
27
revised a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
added 4 characters in body
Aug
27
comment a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
If all you're dealing with is arrays, then save is pointless. It'll just return a slice of the same array. However, in the case of general forward ranges, it's quite important, because save results in a slice of the range - it refers to the same elements, but altering the range itself doesn't alter the original - and simply assigning the range to a new variable doesn't necessarily do that. It depends on how the range is implemented. So, save is necessary for generic range-based code (and most range-based code should be generic).
Aug
25
answered a pushBack() function, as opposite to popFront()
Aug
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
19
comment D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?
@DavidEränen Well, you're using const Array!T if you're using opIndex inside of a const function of a struct or class that it's a member of, but if all you're trying to do is use opIndex rather than using it as const in general, it looks like it can easily be made to work. Feel free to open an enhancement request issues.dlang.org or even to create a pull request if you're feeling brave github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos . It looks like more work probably should be done on making Array const-correct though, even if we can't make it completely const-correct.
Aug
19
revised D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?
deleted 1 character in body
Aug
18
answered D: Why is opIndex not const-qualified in the std.container.Array class?