19,669 reputation
43879
bio website github.com/jmdavis
location Fresno, CA
age 32
visits member for 5 years, 1 month
seen Sep 6 at 16:11

Aug
6
comment Call a function taking a stack object as argument with heap based data
Attempting to cast a struct to pointers to the types that it has for member variables implies that you don't have a clue how structs work. I'm with James on this one. This code makes no sense whatsoever.
Aug
5
comment Is it bad practice to alter dynamic arrays that have references to them?
Actually, op and op= are overloaded separately, so if the docs say otherwise, they're wrong. You overload op with opBinary and op= with opAssign. So, they could theoretically do totally separate things (though they shouldn't). I believe that it's done that way to allow for optimizations since op= can do stuff in place rather than having to create a new value with the result. So, if arrays don't act exactly the same with ~ as they do with ~=, it's not particularly special.
Aug
5
revised Is it bad practice to alter dynamic arrays that have references to them?
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Aug
5
revised Is it bad practice to alter dynamic arrays that have references to them?
added 462 characters in body
Aug
5
answered Is it bad practice to alter dynamic arrays that have references to them?
Jul
31
revised How to add element by element of two STL vectors?
added 259 characters in body
Jul
31
comment How to add element by element of two STL vectors?
Ah, good catch. I wasn't paying enough attention. I rarely used indices rather than iterators and my gut reaction to post-increment is very negative. I'm a firm believer in always using pre-increment unless you need post-increment. That way, you don't ever have to worry about whether the temporary will be optimized away. However, it is certainly true in this case that the compiler should have no problem optimizing it away and post-increment would be just as efficient as pre-increment.
Jul
31
comment How to add element by element of two STL vectors?
This looks great and is clean, but if efficiency is the main concern, I'd think that this would actually be slower than simply iterating over the elements and adding them together.
Jul
31
answered How to add element by element of two STL vectors?
Jul
30
answered c++ virtual functions
Jul
26
answered Add elements and clear a vector of pointers in C++
Jul
23
comment Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
@BCS I'd essentially never use goto in any language unless I had no other choice to get the performance I needed. I don't really like labeled continues or labeled breaks either, but I'd be willing to use them if it made good sense in a particular situation. But straight up goto? Pretty much no chance of that. Unless you really need the performance, there's always a better way. So, yeah, it looks like I'm more reluctant to use goto than you are.
Jul
22
comment Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
There's some truth to that, but I'd generally avoid goto like the plague while I'd be quite willing to use string mixins in a variety of circumstances. Now, if there's a better solutions than string mixins, I'll definitely take it, but I'm perfectly willing to put string mixins in my code while I'll think hard and definitely reconsider before actually putting a goto in my code.
Jul
21
comment Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
However, given how mixing in strings tends to mess up the line numbers of errors for the rest of the file (even if the mixin is fine), it might be good practice to mixout the newlines in the mixin just so that the other error messages are sensible.
Jul
21
comment Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
@FeepingCreature LOL. Cute. That would help with the line in the error message indicating the line that the string is mixed in on as well as error messages later in the file, but it wouldn't help with finding the error in the mixin itself. Of course, since you don't even necessarily know what the code being mixed in looks like, knowing which line number in it is bad doesn't necessarily help you anyway. I suppose that the moral of the story is that string mixins that work are great, but buggy ones can be a pain to fix.
Jul
21
revised Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
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Jul
21
answered Is using D string mixins for code reuse an anti-pattern?
Jul
20
comment GTK: How to ignore “can't open display” errors?
I can easily see the devs for a GUI toolkit never even considering that someone would want to run a GUI app without the GUI. Normally, that makes no sense. In fact, I'd be more surprised if it were possible than if it weren't. That would be like trying to run a console app without stdin, stdout, or stderr. Things just don't work that way. I can see why you'd want it under these circumstances, but you're doing something highly abnormal. It would seem much more reasonable to change your app to just skip the graphics stuff if there's no GUI (be it by a command-line flag or by detecting it).
Jul
20
answered C++ and returning a null - what worked in Java doesn't work in C++
Jul
20
comment C++ and returning a null - what worked in Java doesn't work in C++
While I do think that GMan is being a bit harsh, it really does look like you should thoroughly read an intro C++ book. Even if you're able to read it quickly, it will definitely show you a number of holes in your understanding. C++ is very similar to Java in many respects, but it's also very different, and it's easy to shoot yourself in the foot because you think that you understand how something works.