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seen Mar 19 at 10:11

Jan
31
accepted Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
I see. So after moving an object in memory, the GC changes the value of the corresponding reference at its (the reference's) current memory location, correct?
Dec
16
accepted How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Thanks for your response. The first thing that I did not consider is that the GC stalls the JIT-compiled code while garbage collecting. Does the compiled code then access this 'object reference table' whenever it has to access data through a given reference?
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Thanks for your response. However, I did understand what the code that I posted does. I was rather interested in what the JIT compiler does with it (and ultimately how I can find the relevant part of the code in e.g. Mono or SSCLI).
Dec
16
asked How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Oct
15
answered Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
@Mike You were right. I ran it from Visual Studio with Release selected. However, turns out that when I ran the executable outside Visual Studio, both options performed similarly. Sorry for wasting everyone's time. Is there a way to run the release build from VS2012?
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
It was (Release, x64, Optimized). <br> In the meantime, I also 1:1 copied the decompiled code into my source file (the OrderBy extension method and all classes it uses) and got the same results. The only difference between both remains two attributes that I could not use ([__DynamicallyInvokable] and [TargetedPatchingOptOut("..")]). This suggests to me that it has to be either them, some decompilation problem or that .NET treats libraries differently to user code.
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Just to clarify: This IS the internal LINQ implementation! Or at least what a .NET decompiler outputs. So my question is not about how to make it faster, but why two equivalent (my assumption based on the above) pieces of code perform so differently.
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Added all the code (In case I am not allowed to post decompiled code here, please remove). But the point should have been that the code should not matter because it should be the same as used by the default IEnumerable query provider.
Oct
15
revised Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
added 5145 characters in body
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Now you lost me. With third-party you mean the decompiled Microsoft LINQ code? My assumption was that using this code, my Enumerable and the .Net implementation should be mostly equivalent. This is the reason why I do not understand the performance difference. Unless there are differences between the decompiled code and the original code or .NET uses better optimizations for System libraries.
Oct
15
awarded  Editor
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
The actual implementation is quite a bit of code as it uses classes and methods that are internal to System.LINQ and I also had to replicate them. I will try to outline it above.
Oct
15
revised Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
added 820 characters in body
Oct
15
asked Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Jan
29
comment Where is CopyToNative defined?
The benchmark is run twice and only the second time prints measurements, so DLL should be loaded and symbol located. I use fixed(int* ptr = array){...} and then pass the pointer to native, so I think there should not be any marshalling either. I seem to fail to reimplement other Marshal methods at a similar speed as well. My WriteInt32 can't keep up with the .NET implementation. The problem is, that .NET does not have WriteDecimal or WriteDateTime, so in the end, I have to be able to implement a fast version.
Jan
26
comment Where is CopyToNative defined?
I did some benchmarking for Marshal.Copy() (.NET) and a simple own implementation that basically only calls RtlCopyMemory via PInvoke for small data sizes (here: 10-element int array copied a few thousand times back and forth between an array and native storage). Marshal.Copy was over two times faster. What is the explanation for this? Is there a way to write an equally fast implementation?
Jan
25
accepted Where is CopyToNative defined?