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  • 10 votes cast
Jan
20
accepted Unexpected exit status when using -pass-exit-codes in g++
Jan
20
comment Unexpected exit status when using -pass-exit-codes in g++
I was looking to differentiate internal g++ errors from source code errors, in particular, I need to identify the following error: fatal_error (input_location, "had to relocate PCH"); (gcc/gcc-common.c). Based on my quick look at the code, fatal would be an exit code of 1, is this correct?
Jan
20
comment Unexpected exit status when using -pass-exit-codes in g++
Makes sense. Question then is what are the exit codes for version >=4? Did not find them anywhere and could not think of ways to provoke an exit code other than 1 (which I assume must mean "source file could not be compiled").
Jan
20
asked Unexpected exit status when using -pass-exit-codes in g++
Apr
12
comment Why does cost to access unmanaged memory in C# occasionally reach 120ms?
@Hans: Under what circumstance would a process steal RAM from anther process? Why would this happen when there is enough free physical memory available? I tried to recreate the allocations and some random memory accesses in a micro benchmark and the problem did not occur there. Scott: I do not use task manager for any benchmarking, but just to ensure that my application does not run out of physical memory.
Apr
11
asked Why does cost to access unmanaged memory in C# occasionally reach 120ms?
Mar
23
comment Implementation of FCallAddSub
This should be quite close to the Microsoft source code.
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
12
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
23
comment Visual Studio 2012 MVC Local DB Add Table menu option missing
I had the same problem and your solution solved it. Thanks.
Jan
31
accepted Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
I see. So after moving an object in memory, the GC changes the value of the corresponding reference at its (the reference's) current memory location, correct?
Dec
16
accepted How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Thanks for your response. The first thing that I did not consider is that the GC stalls the JIT-compiled code while garbage collecting. Does the compiled code then access this 'object reference table' whenever it has to access data through a given reference?
Dec
16
comment How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Thanks for your response. However, I did understand what the code that I posted does. I was rather interested in what the JIT compiler does with it (and ultimately how I can find the relevant part of the code in e.g. Mono or SSCLI).
Dec
16
asked How does CLR deal with accesses to array indexes of fields of objects
Oct
15
answered Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
@Mike You were right. I ran it from Visual Studio with Release selected. However, turns out that when I ran the executable outside Visual Studio, both options performed similarly. Sorry for wasting everyone's time. Is there a way to run the release build from VS2012?
Oct
15
comment Performance of Enumerable that tries to replicate LINQ OrderBy
It was (Release, x64, Optimized). <br> In the meantime, I also 1:1 copied the decompiled code into my source file (the OrderBy extension method and all classes it uses) and got the same results. The only difference between both remains two attributes that I could not use ([__DynamicallyInvokable] and [TargetedPatchingOptOut("..")]). This suggests to me that it has to be either them, some decompilation problem or that .NET treats libraries differently to user code.