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May
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15
revised links and embedded for JSON REST API
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Apr
14
comment C++ templates, method prototypes and implementation
Ah, i see. Thanks!
Apr
14
accepted C++ templates, method prototypes and implementation
Apr
14
revised C++ templates, method prototypes and implementation
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Apr
14
asked C++ templates, method prototypes and implementation
Apr
9
accepted Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
Hmm, ok. Well, maybe i need to get some sleep and then look into those iterator abstractions. Thanks alot...it was useful!
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
If for example i had just a single list, i would call emplace(), save the iterator and later i would know what list instance to call. Since there is only one. But if i have, maybe, 3 list's, and save iterators for all 3 of them, i dont have enough information when i need to adress the iterators?
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
Yes, forgive me, im not used to C++. It doesn't have to be an actual, C style pointer. The user just has to be able to adress particular nodes. Like with the 'emplace()' example above. BUT, that still leaves me with the question: when the user calls my priority_queue class with some iterator, or other abstraction, how will the priority_queue class know what heap instance to call, if it maintains a collection of them? If i have a priority_queue class that has access to a, say, heap_modifier class, i could do it easily. However, im thinking there is a more C++ 'ish approach...
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
std::list also has emplace() that returns an iterator to the inserted node. Then i would keep that iterator, and delete or replace the node later, if i wanted to. Is that such a bad idea?
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
But, using std::list couldn't i just store an iterator to an element and then call erase on the list if i wanted to? As far as i understand, std::list iterators are not invalidated by operating on the list.
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
It is like a binomial queue yes, but using perfect binary heaps instead. It's a fairly complicated gadget. Probably mostly of theoretical interest, but thats life of a student :)
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
Yes. But i know the letter is in one of the mailboxes, just not which one. I don't want the program to scan all the mailboxes to find the mailbox containing the letter. I probably have around ten million letters, scattered across 20 or so mailboxes.
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
The exact details, im not sure about yet. Maybe the user is responsible for supplying a node, containing an element, or they will be returned a reference to the node once it's in the queue. Either way, the user will be able to store these references in his/her apllication. My working prototype is not written with classes and objects. It's "handwritten" C, so i just operate on the nodes and trees as i wish. However, part of the project is to do it in C++. Good OOP design is not my strong side.
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
Well, if its of interest here is some background: cphstl.dk/Paper/TOCS-2011/journal.pdf But my problem is not the heaps. The user will supply the reference to the node. The forest will implement a priority queue(adressable, meldable). Thus, the user will store pointers to the nodes in their application. The user doesn't know anything about the implementation, but they do know that they can call priority_queue.delete(*node) (or similar)
Apr
9
comment Program design for maintaining a collection of trees
My problem is not as such to operate on the heaps, but more of a general OOP thing... i think. Say i had a mailbox class that would hold letters. The mailbox would have methods like trash letter, send letter and so on. Then say i instantiate three mailboxes. Now, given only a reference to some letter, not the containing mailbox, i want to, say, trash the letter. I would know which method to call, but not which mailbox object to call it on.