756 reputation
721
bio website linkedin.com/in/daemoohn
location Bucharest, Romania
age 29
visits member for 5 years
seen Sep 1 at 6:36
Developer

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
21
awarded  Notable Question
May
17
accepted Query DB2 using collation
May
16
revised Query DB2 using collation
added 27 characters in body
May
15
asked Query DB2 using collation
Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Yearling
Aug
7
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
13
awarded  Caucus
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Apr
26
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
Yes, I know what Ayende wrote. I read his blogs and I find them sometimes to be true for a particular context. I beieve it's not our context. We don't delete not because we want to audit (that might not be in plan); imagine that currently we don't have a recycle bin in our application; that doesn't mean there won't be any of it in the (near) future. If you're concerned about query time, we could index on the business key of the entity and the column IsActive and be done with it.
Apr
26
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
I want to disable that entity. I want the domain to be unaware of disabled entities. The business is unaware that when I delete entities, I just disable them.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
As a general point, with a clear head, I will not implement the feature in the post (I will close the question) since it's not really that okay(thanks Stefan Steinegger for showing the direction). Regarding the repository part, I use a specification every time I want something from DAL, and it's DAL's job interpreting that specification. That means it's okay to create a specification in BLL and pass it to DAL to evaluate and return some data (that's querying). Yes, loading entities is not persistence ignorant, but working with them in business logic, it should be. It lessens the complexity.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
You mean how will I ignore the inactive entities attached to an aggregate root. I think of two possibilities: 1) you load them by hand from repository; 2) you run a specification over the tree.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
It is correct, inverse one-to-many. I am intrigued more by the actual implementation than by its usability, that is a big mistake. The implementation should provide no surprises for the actual user, another mistake I would make.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
Why I don't do IsActive = false in entities? Because I believe that's not its place. It is persistence related, in my opinion. Inactive entities would be brought to life out of band, not part of a business scenario. So, if it's not a business behaviour, it shouldn't be represented in code.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
I have an entity with a backreference to an aggregate root. I do perform aggregateRoot.Entities.Remove(entity). Here, NH will update the entity with a null reference to the aggregateRoot (the back-reference); of course I don't want NH to actually delete (physically) the item from the DB. What I want is that when I remove an entity from the collection and then go and persist changes, the entity should be marked as inactive but still be member of the collection. This way, I believe, developers will be less stressed with persistence in BLL and the code will speak for itself.
Apr
23
comment NHibernate Interceptor clarification (on deletion/ dirty)
Well I do have a method RemoveEntity(Entity entity); in its implementation I do the above thing, aggregateRoot.Entities.Remove(entity). That is the code from the aggregateRoot domain object, not from business layer.