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4h
answered How can I skip a value and go to the next one in fscanf(), and how can I fscanf() a specific type
9h
comment Changing a process's current working directory programmatically
chdir
1d
answered Few novice questions about C, problems with scanf and conversion specifiers
1d
comment Bison: $1 doesn't return the entire token value
Doesn't look like you're setting $$ in any of the expr rules, so you should get random garbage when you read $2...
1d
comment Is there a difference between float(x)/y and x/float(y)?
I guess this comes under the heading of "compilers may use any level of precision they please for float/double/long double" as otherwise gcc fails to follow the standard. In particular, depending on optimization level and other things it sometimes converts directly to double (ignoring the explicit float) and other times does not...
1d
comment Is there a difference between float(x)/y and x/float(y)?
They may be (and generally are for all except for some embedded compilers) converted to double first.
1d
answered Is there a difference between float(x)/y and x/float(y)?
1d
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
Your question basically seems to come down to "Is there a way to check while compiling one file what flags will eventually be used to compile some other file?", to which the answer is obviously no -- the second compile might not even have occured yet. Instead, you need to pick some flag (it can be anything you want) and pass it consistently to all compiles. Perhaps -DUSING_GCC or -DUSING_GPP
1d
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
Your edit shows why the question makes little sense -- since the file is called main.cpp, g++ will be used to compile it regardless of whether you invoke g++ or gcc on the command line (in the latter case, gcc will just call g++ for you), so you always get "compiled using g++". If you want to force using gcc regardless of name, you can use the command line argument -x c, but then it won't compile at all, as it's not valid C code.
1d
comment Algorithm for hashing a hash table
What does this have to do with hashing or hash tables? If you want an algorithm to solve the problem for a given set of arrays, there's no need (or use) for a hash table.
2d
answered Confusion over argument dependent lookup and friend function definition
2d
answered Assembly - why is %rsp decremented by so much, and why are arguments stored at the top of the stack?
2d
comment Pointer to end of a function code
You cannot subtract function pointers in standard C, only object pointers. You also can't convert (cast) function pointers to object pointers or vice versa, though most compilers allow it.
2d
awarded  Yearling
Sep
17
answered how to determine if process is idle in C
Sep
16
comment popen()/fgets() intermittently returns incomplete output
@JoshuaJohnson: Since the spec doesn't say it's ok, its implicitly not ok. The POSIX statement is about fgetc, not fgets, and has the note "The functionality described on this reference page is aligned with the ISO C standard. Any conflict between the requirements described here and the ISO C standard is unintentional. This volume of POSIX.1-2008 defers to the ISO C standard"
Sep
15
answered popen()/fgets() intermittently returns incomplete output
Sep
15
revised Function sscanf not respecting width field
added 264 characters in body
Sep
15
answered Function sscanf not respecting width field
Sep
15
comment Function sscanf not respecting width field
Since you specify 2 characters per component, it scans at most 2 per component. What do you expect it to do on an input with more characters?