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50m
revised GNU Make, building unnecessary dependencies
added 10 characters in body
1h
answered GNU Make, building unnecessary dependencies
12h
comment understanding the basics of dFdX and dFdY
possible duplicate of Explanation of dFdx
18h
comment Unsigned char vs char in C — comparison of strings
@chux: that's why the casts are unneeded in this code -- there's no possibility of overflow, so they make no difference.
20h
comment Unsigned char vs char in C — comparison of strings
@TivBroc: no you don't, or at least not from the casts. If you're seeing an infinite loop, you must be doing something else different, like leaving off the parentheses around the assignment, or the !
20h
comment Unsigned char vs char in C — comparison of strings
Why do you think you need the (unsigned char *) casts? The code will work exactly the same without them. The only time you need to convert to unsigned is if you have a possibility of overflow or values that are out of range for a particular signed type.
1d
comment Optimizing string creation
Have you measured it? Actually opening a file and writing to it is likely to be 10-100x more expensive...
1d
comment Is { a^m b^n | 1 ≤ m ≤ n } context-free?
You almost have the b^j part in your B rule (just missing j=0), but your A rule just matches a^i, not a^i b^i like you need.
2d
comment How to store non-copyable std::function into a container?
You may be able to use a std::reference_wrapper<NonCopyable>, which you can then put into the std::vector<std::function<...>> container.
2d
revised How to have a class contain a list of pointers to itself?
added 368 characters in body
2d
answered How to have a class contain a list of pointers to itself?
2d
comment Is { a^m b^n | 1 ≤ m ≤ n } context-free?
hint: this is equivalent to { a^i b^i b^j | 1 ≤ i, 0 ≤ j }. If you can create cfgs for the a^i b^i part and the b^j part independently and combine them...
Jan
28
answered Preserving Registers?
Jan
27
answered In x86, why do I have the same instruction two times, with reversed operands?
Jan
27
answered __int64 for GCC as a Preprocessor Option
Jan
26
comment Variadic Function Overloading in C
@sweetname: It gets the first character of the string literal -- that will be a NUL character if and only if the VA_ARGS is empty
Jan
26
comment Lex and yacc program to find palindrome string
Not really correct -- the grammar is not ambiguous in any way. It is non-deterministic (so no simple deterministic parser generator can deal with it), but a GLR parser (such as can be generated by bison) can deal with it just fine (albeit slowly).
Jan
26
answered Variadic Function Overloading in C
Jan
26
comment Bitwise operators and signed types
@harold: That may be your definition, and may be what some implementations do, but that's not any sort of standard. The normal definition of One's complement is a way of representing negative numbers (so ~x == -x on a machine that uses one's complement arithmetic). The C++ standard is silent on what it means with respect to signed integers, so it might mean anything. Yet another underspecified hole in the standard.
Jan
26
comment Bitwise operators and signed types
@MattMcNabb: They both have integer promotions, but they define them differently. The upshot is that if you do a binary operation between a signed char and an unsigned char, on C they'll promote to unsigned int and do an unsigned op, and on C++ they'll promote to signed int and do a signed op. No good reason for the difference, they're just different.