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Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@AntoineL: using "not bizarre" and "VAX D-float" together is an oxymoron :-)
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@chux: You are correct in that this is yet another place where the C spec is "broken" -- underspecified, allowing behavior that completely breaks the original intent of the feature in question.
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@PascalCuoq: Since the leading bit is explicit in 8087-extended, you can produce numbers where it is clear. So the printf/scanf code needs to be able to deal with that case.
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@chux: while the spec doesn't formally require it, it would be a rather bizarre implementation that did extra work to produce something else for a floating point format with a hidden 1 bit.
Mar
20
revised C printf %a and %La
added 255 characters in body
Mar
20
answered C printf %a and %La
Mar
20
comment UDP sockets: recvfrom and receive address
@EJP: There's no way to tell from the received packed if it came from a legitimate UDP socket or from a raw socket with a spoofed source address...
Mar
20
comment Storing to Stack instead of RAM
Why are you messing with ebp in your push/pop stuff? -- just do sub+mov for push and mov+add for pop. You need to keep esp 16-byte aligned (which messing with ebp screws up), and you need to not modify ebp (which messing with ebp screws up)
Mar
19
answered Execution-independent backtrace addresses
Mar
16
comment Strength reduction techniques with Bison
Well, on most machines, a test+conditional branch is much more expensive than a multiply, so this is unlikely to ever help irrespective of bison. But in general, bison doesn't touch/modify anything in {} -- it just passes it on to the C compiler.
Mar
16
comment Strength reduction techniques with Bison
Since bison does not have any multiplication or division anywhere in its language, its not clear what you are asking. Of course, the C code in the actions can do those things, but that is just C code, and your C compiler will optimize it -- bison doesn't touch it.
Mar
15
answered Avoiding to defer “child” object construction with `operator<<`
Mar
15
comment Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
@PankajDwivedi: On startup/login/window creation the terminal settings will initially be canonical (buffering up to enter and processing backspaces). After that, they are whatever programs set them to.
Mar
15
revised Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
added 205 characters in body
Mar
15
revised Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
added 11 characters in body
Mar
15
comment Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
@BasileStarynkevitch: setvbuf only controls output buffering -- it has no effect on stdin or input of any kind.
Mar
15
answered Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
Mar
15
comment Why does scanf returns control back to the program on pressing Enter key?
Actually stdio buffering is completely irrelevant for input, as it is always buffered (needs a place to put characters read), and scanf reads from that buffer. The issue here is terminal buffering, controlled by tcsetattr.
Mar
14
answered std::shared_ptr thread safety
Mar
12
answered compiler doesn't recognize FILE* variable