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Jan
16
comment Using generic std::function objects with member functions in one class
Shouldn't it be &Foo::doSomething (double colon)?
Jan
15
comment Python - read line from file, process it, then remove it
Thank you, I fixed it
Jan
11
comment Visual Studio - Slow launching of quick find
Thank you! This has fixed it for me.
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
@Loopunroller No it doesn't. Sorry. I get 'N' : invalid template argument for 'make_index_list', expected compile-time constant expression
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
I tried removing constexpr and it didn't work. It was complaining about volatile values, where it expected constants.
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
@Loopunroller. No, it doesn't. Sorry. constexpr is not supported in VC++2013. I see that I need to install VC++ 2013 November CTP to have support for constexpr. I'll do that try again.
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
@dyp Unfortunately your code doesn't work with VC++ 2013.
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
@Loopunroller It's both actually. In reality every slot should have a type from a separate list. And there will be several slot. 5 or more. Besides types there will be integers. So doing this by hand is too tedious.
Oct
4
comment Creating an instance of a specialized class depending on run-time arguments
Actually I also need this for several types rather than two. I used two types to demonstrate the idea.
May
2
comment boost Date_Time date parsing doesn't work
@ebyrob That's true. I oversimplified the sample code. I've fixed it now.
Mar
16
comment Getting value of template parameter from embracing type
@Constructor Static constant is the same as static function in this respect. If I were to create a specialized class template <> class A<1> {}; I would have to copy this constant along.
Mar
3
comment Accuracy of TextRenderer.MeasureText results
It's worked for me. Thank you!
Mar
2
comment Passing a complicated object from C# to C++
I cannot use COM and managed C++, because the code is supposed to run on Linux too.
Feb
24
comment Empty string becomes null when passed from Delphi to C# as a function argument
I have updated my question with interface declaration. I didn't add it in the first place, because it was auto generated from the type library.
Feb
23
comment I can't debug native code running .NET assemblies in VS 2012 anymore
This is great! Thank you very much! It has worked for me. I'm wondering, how did you manage to figure this out.
Nov
24
comment Passing large data structures to unmanaged code using fixed pointer
@Christian.K So it's not automatic, rather it's per method call. It seems that I'm fine then?
Nov
23
comment C++: Code injection to call a function
@Kra In most cases you cannot just copy your C function to another process, because jump addresses will be broken. You have to either fix relocs or write a code which is relocatable. In both cases you have to use assembly language. To answer your question about function code length, I think you can try disabling optimizations and write two functions f1() and f2(), where f2 follows f1 in code. Then you can subtract address of f1 from the address of f2 and [hopefully] get the length of f1. But function size is the least of your problems here.
Nov
12
comment Force foreach to use const iterators
I understand that. It just seems strange that STL uses c-prefixed functions to make the constness explicit and foreach can only work with implicit constness.
Nov
12
comment Force foreach to use const iterators
@kfsone Yes, that's true. Thank you, I've updated the code. But in my case it's just an integer.
Nov
12
comment Force foreach to use const iterators
The reason was to limit container mutations to a few functions.