5,062 reputation
22440
bio website profiles.google.com/JohnMcG
location United States
age 38
visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

Seattle based developer in C++ in Java.


Apr
29
comment Managing interruptions with increased seniority
Thank you for saving the Internet.
Apr
29
comment Managing interruptions with increased seniority
This question is 5 1/2 years old. Might you consider the possibility that his was part of the SO culture then?
Dec
31
comment C++ : suitable Data Structure for this given scenario
By what are the criteria, we mean that data structure choice is dependent on several factors, some of which you outline here (expected size, shape of data to be stored), some of which you do not (what are you optimizing for? Insertion speed? Lookup speed? Deletion? Memory usage?) This is why there are different data structures. Otherwise, the answer would always be the same.
Feb
11
comment C++ handling invalid parameters
If you trip an assertion, the program will end, and the user will see the message, "assertion failed, x != 0," or whatever the assertion condition is. The client developer has no control over it. An exception, on the other hand, would give the client developer the ability to catch and handle it. One other problem with the assertion approach is that many compilers turn off assertions in release builds.
Feb
8
comment C++ handling invalid parameters
This is probably good if we're talking about an internal function that only your own code calls. If this is an interface method to some other client, you don't want to trip an assertion. An assertion says "I made a mistake," not "you made a mistake." You shouldn't have an assertion failure in production code.
Feb
8
comment What does returning zero by convention mean?
Yeah, something like that. Or they can be strung together on a command line with && so a failure of the first command will short-circuit and prevent the second process from being called.
Dec
18
comment trying to get multimap to print out questions
In that case, I don't see any code that is supposed to actually print. From what I can tell, this simply returns a pointer to a random set of questions for the provided level. The calling function would then need to do the printing.
Dec
18
comment trying to get multimap to print out questions
Do you mean that it always returns NULL, or that it doesn't do any printing?
Jul
26
comment Check if instance exists and return reference in Singleton getInstance();
@Sled No, the static keyword indicates that instance is the only one created for each invocation. You can play with an static int variable in a function you call several times to see how it works.
Jul
25
comment Why is part of my code not executed?
Edited to note after being corrected that compiler will not allow arithmetic between pointer variables, though it seems less likely that String would be convertable to a numeric type, so my suspicion seems less valid.
Jul
25
comment Why is part of my code not executed?
@Nawaz Yup, did another one with conversion operators that didn't work.
Jul
25
comment Why is part of my code not executed?
This sample program:int main() { char* p1, p2; char* p3 = p1 + p2; return 0; } compiles in gcc.
Jul
25
comment Why is part of my code not executed?
You have GeDebugOut() takes in char*, When you pass it the string literal, it chooses that one, so your + is doing pointer arithmetic instead of string concatenation, especially if String has a conversion to char*.
Jul
2
comment Is it ok to dynamic cast “this” as a return value?
IMO, exposing implementation details is a greater sin than duplicate forwarders.
Jun
5
comment Floating point rounding
You decide to use a floating point representation of pi/2. Now you've got 1.5707964 problems.
Jun
4
comment C++ Array vs Vector performance test explanation
4.09106 / 2.85107 < 2. With times that small, there are a number of reasons not related to the code for this discrepancy. You probably want to run the test several times.
May
21
comment reading from a text file to array in c++?
I'm guessing there's some homework restrictions here. But didn't want to ask. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/130558/…
May
21
comment #include Header Files When They Are In a Different Directory Structure
Well you cans string together ".."'s e.g. #include ../../../../../../f2/f3/f4/f5/myFile.cpp which is so ugly I immediately regret typing it. I'd recommend setting the include path in the makefile.
May
21
comment #include Header Files When They Are In a Different Directory Structure
You can obviously put that whole relative or absolute path in your include statement (which I wouldn't recommend), but I suspect you're looking for something a bit more compact?
May
21
comment Should a developer aim for readability or performance first?
@OutlawLemur I'm aware of that. But some people ask whether it would be better to, for example, construct loops using < or <= (with the comparison value being incremented beforehand in the latter case).