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comment Difference between std::system_clock and std::steady_clock?
@James McNellis, that's true, but in practice the system_clock will only be non-steady on fantasy computers that the C++ standard tries to accommodate. The thing is, system_clock maps to std::time_t values (C-style time), and I know of no platform (no non-exotic or ancient platform at least) where the C std::time() function is not the same as POSIX time. And POSIX time is, by definition, "steady".
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comment Difference between std::system_clock and std::steady_clock?
This is correct, of course - but system_clock is the only clock that maps to C time (i.e. to std::time_t values), and the C time() function is almost always the same as POSIX time (I know of no platform where it's not) - and POSIX time is, by definition, "steady" - it's not affected by daylight savings or anything like that. So the result is that in practice, system_clock always meets the requirements of steady_clock, except on exotic platforms that don't use POSIX time for C style time.
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