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Sep
18
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
Maybe you will get lucky, and the literals are already in the form G'blah' instead of G'<blah>' :)
Sep
18
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
@EDIT2: That certainly looks like it could be it. I was about to suggest treating the encoding as bytes, but then I saw a previous question you posted regarding Shift-JIS and how it could appear in identifiers and looking at the documentation. Perphaps treating it as you say may work, but there's a lingering doubt in my mind: The code you are given is supposedly Shift-JIS encoded, but what the Enterprise COBOL manual says is supported seems to be are EBCDIC DBCS encoded in literals, comments, and user-defined words. What transformations has the code gone through?
Sep
17
answered Oracle sequences: CURRVAL not allowed here?
Sep
17
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
Further exploration shows that some COBOL compilers have an option associated with this: --- The SOSI option (ref: COBOL for AIX: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v7v91/… ) --- The default is NOSOSI. Whether a shift-out shift-in is required before and after the quotations may be optional depending on the compiler option .. at least this is true for other compilers.
Sep
17
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
Not sure if it means anything, but just out of curiosity, I checked the Microfocus Object Cobol language reference to see how they handled DBCS literals, and they seemed to do it slightly differently. Rather than require the shift-in / shift-out character, they treated the G' as the beginning delimiter, and ' had to appear twice if it was a DCBS character, otherwise it was the closing delimiter. It may be something that's left up to the compiler, or it may be that your intuition was correct... URL: supportline.microfocus.com/documentation/books/ocds42/…
Sep
17
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
Have you tried to simplify the rule? It seems it was copied from the definition of the other literals. Wouldn't something like "<AnythingButShiftIn><Anything> | <ShiftIn><Notsquote>" be sufficient for the inside portion ( inside the ( ... ) * )? Is there any possibility of any EBCDIC/ASCII DBCS conversions throwing a wrench in the works? By the way, which parser / lexer are you using? Is this an in-house development?
Sep
16
comment Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
How about \"? Is this is supposed to only match constant of the type G'< ... >' or of the type G"< ... >" ?
Sep
15
answered Japanese COBOL Code: rules for G literals and identifiers?
Sep
15
comment Regular Expression: Numeric range
No, I just read "0 or 000 to 180" and interpreted to mean: 0 as one digit, or the range 000 to 180 as three digits. When I said "If you need the two digit range..." I should have also mentioned the one digit range, so in regards to that you are correct.
Sep
15
comment Conflict between a namespace and a define
You are right, it's not really good practice, and would easily lead to hard to debug side effects later on to assume that the value of a label will always be a given constant. But in my defense, it was not my first suggestion nor my last, and I never said anything about a good fix, I said it was a simple fix (or a quick fix) - and those types of fixes do usually cause hard to debug side-effects!
Sep
15
awarded  Editor
Sep
15
revised Conflict between a namespace and a define
corrected spelling
Sep
4
awarded  Teacher
Sep
4
answered Conflict between a namespace and a define
Sep
4
answered Regular Expression: Numeric range