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Sep
16
comment Accessing individual digits of a BigUint in rust
@C.Quilley: It may be the right way. I'm wondering if internal BigDigits are actually base 10. If not string output is certainly the way. Would you care to provide an answer ?
Sep
16
asked Accessing individual digits of a BigUint in rust
Sep
10
revised character pointer takes the address of what
added 671 characters in body
Sep
10
comment character pointer takes the address of what
-1: In the first case above, a is not a pointer as said in comment but an array.
Sep
10
revised character pointer takes the address of what
added 293 characters in body
Sep
10
comment character pointer takes the address of what
strlen never counts the trailing '\0', if you have a string only containing '\0' it's strlen will be 0.
Sep
10
answered character pointer takes the address of what
Sep
4
awarded  Yearling
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
Another interpretation could be that instead of reference-by-reference that particular case implies a dynamic binding of the external reference. It would be the only place where we have that, but at least it's useful and semantic is consistent with a local functor.
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
making lambda useless is much too strong. It merely affects functions defined at to level returning a lambda and containing reference parameters. If this is not well defined behavior nobody should do that, ever. And a lambda capturing by reference a local variable of the function returning the lambda is obviously not a good idea (the variable would never be defined at call time). The only usefull use case is when the top level function provide a reference parameter that can be captured by lambda.
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
(2) It is indeed an UB, but it's not stated that way in the standard, the phrasing means that the opposite is defined... if there was a reaching scope containing our variable it would be defined. Indeed we don't have one here, but it's undefined "by default" not explicitly. In many other parts of the standard it says "such behavior is undefined", not here. It would be ridiculous here to leave it undefined explcitely to make room for implementations, because UB is basically useless for everybody. In other words it looks like a minor bug in the standard, not a feature.
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
(1) It is indeed explicit that the captured entity is the reference, but that does not mean that you take a reference to it (something that is meaningless), but it just means that you take it. In other words that the lambda capture points to the same storage as the initial reference whatever it can be. It's exactly the same thing that instantiation of a local class containing some explicit reference member with x. Lambdas are something syntaxically new but not semantically new, you can do that from ages using a quite verbose syntax.
Sep
3
revised Why is alloca not considered good practice?
deleted 2 characters in body
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
@BenVoigt: I've read it. It merely suggest that the above case may be undefined behavior with some implementations. But it's still not explicitly said. As this use case seems simple enough making it an UB does not look such a good idea. Also the suggested EBP implementation wouldn't be a problem if the function is inlined (it may even allow further optimisations). And if using the most common implementation of reference using a hidden pointer you just have to copy that hidden pointer to have a capture by reference. I see nowhere any hint of reference-to-reference.
Sep
3
comment Capturing a reference by reference in a C++11 lambda
I do not see your reference-to-reference in the quoted standard, but indeed it should be clarified. The problem seems to be related to creation of a function returning a reference, which can indeed lead to a reference being the outermost entity of the reaching scope. But in that case I would follow the same rule as for lambda enclosing lambdas: "if m1 [external lambda] captures the entity by reference m2 [internal lambda] captures the same entity captured by m1". In the example context the equivalent would be the lambda refering to the same entity as the enclosing function.
Sep
2
comment What are the differences between a pointer variable and a reference variable in C++?
@BenVoigt: I believe I will have to dig in that, because "taking the address of the reference itself" is still a meaningless sentence to me (because the reference having an address or not should be an implementation detail). I understand C++ lambda as equivalent to a function call with a closure context (all you can do with lambdas can be done using functor objects). There are already troubles (hidden pointers) for optimizers as soon as you pass a parameter to a function or class by reference and I expect the same kind of troubles with lambdas. But I can't see why there would be more troubles.
Sep
2
comment What are the differences between a pointer variable and a reference variable in C++?
@BenVoigt: I still does not understand why it should matter especially with introduction of lambdas, storing the reference external storage is perfectly OK, because that's the meaning of the reference (a reference is a mere alias to some existing storage). Optimizing reference away is much more simple than that, it's merely treating it as an alias of the original variable. That's something hard through function interfaces but easy inside functions body or inlining (because references will always be aliasing the same storage, which is false for pointers).
Sep
2
answered Why is alloca not considered good practice?
Sep
2
comment Why is alloca not considered good practice?
@JuhoÖstman: you can use an array of struct (or of whatever type) instead of char if you have alignement issues.
Sep
2
comment Why is alloca not considered good practice?
Actually the alloca spec does not say it returns an invalid pointer on fail (stack overflow) it says it has undefined behavior... and for malloc it says it returns NULL, not a random invalid pointer (OK, Linux optimistic memory implementation makes that useless).