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Apr
16
comment need help understanding fuchs' iterative countdown permutation algorithm
David, funny that you mentioned TAoCP. I was just thinking the other day, debating between buying TAoCP or ConCrete Mathematics.
Apr
16
comment need help understanding fuchs' iterative countdown permutation algorithm
David, thank you so much for such detailed explanation and it must have taken you hours. I still need to take my time to digest the information you presented here.
Apr
16
comment need help understanding fuchs' iterative countdown permutation algorithm
As a matter of fact I had. I stepped through by hand with a 3-element array, a 4-element array, and a 5-element array (took quite a while). There definitely was some pattern, but I just wasn't able to pinpoint exactly what. I also tried to search for algorithms that permutes by swapping elements, hoping it would help me further understand the swapping pattern in this algorithm, but didn't find any. Here is a related post stackoverflow.com/questions/11915026/… but the answerer also just gave the code and dodged any explanations
Feb
20
comment java File.listFiles() order not guaranteed and causes JUnit tests to fail
Great -- it seems unanimous that sorting is the way to go, and I will definitely do that. Thanks everyone!
Feb
20
comment java File.listFiles() order not guaranteed and causes JUnit tests to fail
Thanks for responding. The application aggregates the information found in these files, and each line is an independent unit of information. the receiver of the output acts on each line, so I didn't think sorting was necessary. But judging from all the responses, it does seem sorting the output is the best way to go, and I will put that in place. @GaborSch I am not clear on your comment regarding moving to the cloud -- will it have any impact on sorting?
Feb
7
comment how to tell maven assembly on a submodule to include only dependencies this module needs?
@Duncan thank you very much for the suggestion. I am still quite new to maven and didn't know about the dependency:tree command. This is very useful. It appears that hbase jar has a dependency on jersey, so that is why it is included.
Feb
7
comment how to tell maven assembly on a submodule to include only dependencies this module needs?
@Andrew yes, the cl-client pom inherits from parent pom
Oct
19
comment what is the difference between Void and unbounded wildcard in Java generics?
@Arham I am pretty sure your comment is still there. Just found out that they changed this from JDK6 to JDK7 (which was what I was looking at -- see rolve's reply below)
Oct
19
comment what is the difference between Void and unbounded wildcard in Java generics?
Thank you rolve, especially for posting JDK6 and JDK7 side by side, which made things more clear. So it seems more like a matter of what makes more sense rather than what's right and wrong.
Oct
19
comment what is the difference between Void and unbounded wildcard in Java generics?
Thank you and yes, but I am still not quite sure why the submit() method returns a Future<?> instead of a Future<Void>
Oct
19
comment what is the difference between Void and unbounded wildcard in Java generics?
Thank you. I understand the Void as what its javadoc says, but why doesn't the submit() method return a Future<Void>; instead of Future<?> ?
Oct
19
comment what is the difference between Void and unbounded wildcard in Java generics?
that's why I said I was confused. Could you please elaborate a little more? Just saying nothing the same doesn't really help.
Sep
21
comment java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue is not FIFO?
It turned out to be an illusion seen from the client side. See my comment in the Answer.
Sep
21
comment java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue is not FIFO?
Thanks everyone. It turned out to be an illusion from the client side. The LinkedBlockingQueue is indeed FIFO. The seemingly interleaving of the requests is due to the fact that backend request handlers process requests in the queue blazingly fast but sending them back to the client is orders of magnitude slower. By the time a second client sends its requests, the queue is already empty so its requests get processed immediately as well, and then both clients receive results at a slower pace. Sorry about that.