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Software Engineer, embedded systems.

Jan
14
revised ARM Cortex-M4: Running code from external flash
added 15 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Jan
11
comment Difference between unsigned int and int
Why only partially correct? I would say that it is exactly correct. While affirmation of the OPs statement is the correct answer, the stuff about best practice is irrelevant and subjective and best deleted IMO.
Jan
11
revised Difference between unsigned int and int
added 14 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Difference between unsigned int and int
@barakmanos : That is a technique for human interpretation. The interpretation in the question remains correct. If you add the place-values of all the non-zero bits taking the MSB place value as -2<sup>31<sup>, you end up with the same result.
Jan
11
comment error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'A' used
The trivial use of OpenMP timing functions does not really justify the use of the openmp, parallel-processing or multithreading tags. The question is not related to those in any manner.
Jan
11
comment error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'A' used
Update your question; copy & paste the entire content of the "Output" tab window (Alt+2 if it is not currently shown) - this is a plain text output of the build and is often more informative than the filtered "Error List" tab and is easier to copy and paste. Check that the code you have posted is the code to which these errors belong, because it does not produce those errors for me, and it is not valid C++. Add the cast for the malloc() calls, and it builds and runs - the evidence is that you have posted the wrong code or the wrong errors, and it remains bad C++.
Jan
11
comment error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'A' used
This is neither valid C nor C++ code. Are you sure those are the only errors reported? It seems likely that these are precipitated by earlier errors, like the invalid assignment of void* to a double** without a cast (in C++). If you are using C++, you'd do better to use new in any case. What version of VC++ are you using?
Jan
11
revised c - integer downcast
edited body
Jan
11
comment Difference between two pointer variables
@CoolGuy : I know; the question was rhetorical, intended to encourage improvement. That said, the form-factor of the execution platform is hardly rellevant.
Jan
11
comment Unable to click my mouse from C/C++ code
@MartinJames : And you can insert events in the input buffer to simulate a mouse click, which from the OP's own answer appears to be exactly what he wanted.
Jan
11
revised Unable to click my mouse from C/C++ code
added 297 characters in body
Jan
11
answered Unable to click my mouse from C/C++ code
Jan
11
comment Unable to click my mouse from C/C++ code
A mouse is an input device, your read it rather than control it, and you cannot click it in code - you use your finger! ;-)
Jan
11
comment global variable without threads
What is a "wired thing"? What has the performance of printf to do with your question!?
Jan
11
comment global variable without threads
If it "appears that inside foo" something is wrong, it would make sense to let us see inside foo!
Jan
11
answered global variable without threads
Jan
11
comment global variable without threads
On the face of it, there is nothing wrong with the heavily elided code you have shown us, so implicitly you have not shown enough code to determine the problem. I say "nothing wrong", because in all cases globals should be avoided and it isn't at all clear it is justified in this example, and prefixing variables _ is strictly reserved.
Jan
11
comment Difference between two pointer variables
What is a "lapi"?
Jan
11
revised Difference between two pointer variables
added 42 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Difference between two pointer variables
@Avinash : How did you even get i + j to compile let alone result in 60!? (int)i + (int)j == 80, but you have to force reinterpretation as integers for the + to be valid. Equally if you were to print the pointer value i using the %d format specifier, that would reinterpret the address as an integer at runtime. The pointer-diff operator is not the same as an integer-diff despite having the same symbol (-) - it is overloaded, and yields the number of objects of the type pointed to that fit between the two addresses.