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Apr
26
comment (Beginner Programmer) Need help: Linked Lists in C
I think the question is a bit broad. From what I can tell it could be rephrased as "I'm new to coding. I'm getting some compilation errors. Also, my code doesn't work. I'm new though, please help!" Try tackling each of your issues separately. Focusing on one thing can make it a lot less overwhelming. Start with the compilation issues, you should hopefully be able to get through them with some more elbow grease. You may not understand the terminology entirely, but it should at least look "off". For instance, what makes you think that c.names[j] is the same type as dude?
Apr
20
comment Shortest Partial Path in a Graph
I think this solution works but the answer is phrased oddly and it makes it seem like it works "by accident". I think you'd keep the edge weights negative and it even works if there are positive weights. If there are missing edges, add "fake" ones with weight 0. Then when reconstructing the "partial path" just delete any edges with weight 0 (notice that if the edge happened to be "real" you don't care if it's removed since you'd still have a "partial path"). Also there isn't a need for topologically sorting--they're already ordered. Just construct the DP table from right to left
Apr
5
comment Git global ignore not working
I observed this too. I skimmed the documentation but didn't find anything: In addition to .gitignore (per-directory) and .git/info/exclude, git looks into this file for patterns of files which are not meant to be tracked. "~/" is expanded to the value of $HOME and "~user/" to the specified user’s home directory.
Feb
6
comment Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
@SlaterTyranus My comment does not say that the above algorithm has a Theta(n) bound, please reread it (in fact, you can look at my answer on this page to see my proof for the Theta(nlogn) bound). Can you please explain how the logic presented above yields the Theta(n) bound for the other case where the inner loop is j = 0; j < i; j++ because... that algorithm indeed has a Theta(n) time complexity.
Feb
6
comment Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
@SlaterTyranus I generally disagree with the analysis you describe above. That thought process suffices for a big-Oh bound but not for a Theta bound (which is often what people mean when they say big-Oh). For instance suppose that he changed the second loop to be j = 0; j < i; j++ then your analysis would still yield O(n log n) which is true... but it wouldn't be tight. In particular, it'd be Theta(n) => O(n)
Feb
5
revised Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
edited body
Feb
5
revised Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
edited body
Feb
5
answered Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
Feb
5
comment Is runtime o(logn) or o(n)?
The claim and proof are both wrong. It doesn't "run n/2 times" on the second iteration, it runs n - 2 times. You'll see if you break up the summation that it's actually Theta(nlogn) - Theta(n) = Theta(nlogn)
Feb
2
comment potential O(n) solution to Longest Increasing Subsequence
Looking at the wikipedia page you linked it cites a paper for an Omega(nlogn) lower bound. I didn't verify it myself, but I would put money that Omega(nlogn) is indeed a lower bound for common computational models. The citation links to here, where you can download the pdf: sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0012365X7590103X
Feb
2
revised Why can the KMP failure function be computed in O(n) time?
edited body
Jan
20
comment Diameter of Binary Tree - Better Design
@AKS You can trade time for space and add memoization for linear time complexity (because every node's height can be computed from the results of its subtrees in O(1) time). Alternatively, you can use one post-order traversal (which can be done iteratively instead of using recursion) and store those results.
Jan
2
comment Greedy algorithm to find potential weighted activities in order?
@EssamAl-Mansouri I didn't read your question carefully, my bad. I deleted my previous comment
Jan
2
comment How could I rewrite this for loop in list comprehensions
Not an expert in python, but the corresponding list comprehension for the code above is probably a bit long and hard-to-read. It also has side effects which I think you'd usually avoid doing in a list comprehension. edit Ah nvm, I see you only intend to use list comprehension for part of the code. Whoops. I would say it's still a bit long though
Dec
3
comment Type conversion: signed int to unsigned long in C
You can probably do this test yourself by either using a debugger to view values or printing out the values yourself. You can also look at the C language specification. Figure out which specification your compiler supposedly implements and then look up the details in the corresponding spec. "Integer promotion" is probably what you want to look for. FWIW, I believe in C that integer promotion should not change the value. So you'd probably get a sign-extended value
Dec
1
comment DAG Kth shortest path dynamic programming
@yasen Ah I see now how you are using "unset" and that I misread your condition for setting dp[pathLength+1][u]. I think this still works... By the way, this is just a variation of Bellman Ford's, @BoredFoo, heh. Notice that the complexity is appropriate, I'm not sure how you convinced yourself that it was "nothing anywhere near".
Dec
1
comment DAG Kth shortest path dynamic programming
Hm, I guess I forgot more algorithms than I thought. Regardless, why do you think those algorithms have insufficient time complexities? If you let k = n and we know m = O(n^2) then the problem's upper bound is quite large O(n*(m + n)). In particular, Floyd-Warshall and Bellman-Ford are both O(n*(m+n)). The issue is if k < n. You'll need to adapt one of those algorithms so that if k < n then the runtime is still bounded by O(k*(m+n)). I'm being intentionally ambiguous since you're studying. If you read and understand those algorithms the answer should be intuitive.
Dec
1
comment DAG Kth shortest path dynamic programming
Few things. The complexity is O(k(n+m)) with the adjacency list, not O(n+m) which matters because k is not necessarily O(1). Second, you probably shouldn't use 0 as the sentinel value for unset since the edges can have arbitrary weights (e.g. a shortest k-link might have weight 0). Third, typically this algorithm is implemented so that d[pathLength][u] is the shortest weight with up to pathLength edges; and I believe, in fact, that your implementation already does this. Finally, pretty sure you want to remove the is set check. Otherwise this looks about right +1
Dec
1
comment DAG Kth shortest path dynamic programming
Which shortest path algorithm do you know for arbitrary weight DAGs?
Dec
1
comment DAG Kth shortest path dynamic programming
What's the algorithm you're thinking of? And my point is that, if we're thinking of the same algorithm, then it has the correct runtime. It has a time complexity of O(n + k(m + n) + k) which is indeed O(k(m + n)). My hint was that you only think it's too slow because you think k is some small number... what if you set it to n? Then do you see how O(k(m + n)) can be slow?