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6h
comment Interpolating data points in Excel
Image is broken.
2d
comment Why does SOLR not work with jQuery?
@MaryMelody your rejection of larissa's suggested edit to this question was, I think, wrong. You reject-and-edited but all you did was drop some valid corrections and improvements from her suggestion and introduce additional grammar errors; it would have been better to accept the suggestion. See Meta discussion at meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/271298/…
Sep
12
comment What does E_STRICT do?
@KingCrunch I think the question here is very reasonable - if somebody is deciding whether to turn on strict mode, they'd probably like to know in advance what things it will warn over and whether they're sensible so that they know whether they're better off with or without it. I tried turning it on recently and quickly turned it off again when the only thing I could find that it objects to is using abstract static methods - which I and many others think make perfect sense.
Sep
11
comment What is the recommended error_reporting() setting for development? What about E_STRICT?
@hakre, I'm not sure I understand your edit on this answer. You're clearly implying that on 'esoteric systems', it is possible that -1 != ~0. What are these esoteric systems, and do they really exist? Would I be right to guess that PHP's integers are stored in whatever format the C compiler used to compile PHP uses, and that you're thinking of a hypothetical scenario in which somebody compiles PHP on, say, a one's complement C compiler? Anyway, wouldn't simply modifying Gordon's code snippet be better than leaving what's effectively an "actually, the last paragraph is wrong" edit?
Sep
7
comment Handling errors in AWS PHP SDK 2
@AlvinK. you are wrong about this; AWS's PHP SDK automatically throws exceptions upon receiving error responses from the server - not just for connection failures.
Sep
7
comment PHP - Insert date to url
It's difficult to answer this in a way that will be useful to you - let alone future readers - because it's unclear where your problem is. You say you know how to perform redirects, so which step don't you know how to do? Getting tomorrow's date? Formatting it the way you need? Inserting it into the URL you want to redirect to? As soon as you clarify exactly what you need, chances are there'll be an easily-findable duplicate on SO describing exactly how to perform that step.
Sep
6
comment How to get string Objects instead of Unicode ones from JSON in Python?
Take a little care if you decide to use this answer. It works perfectly for Brutus's case, but only because he knows that his data only contains ASCII-encodable characters. If you don't have that guarantee, this answer won't work. For example, try executing yaml.load(json.dumps([u'a', u'£', u'É'])) at the Python shell and observe that you get back ['a', u'\xa3', u'\xc9'] (which contains unicode strings). If you can't be sure that your data only contains characters from the ASCII character set, you should use a different approach instead (I recommend my own answer).
Sep
4
comment What are the best practices for catching and re-throwing exceptions?
There's a reason I think you've missed from your list here - you may not be able to tell whether you can handle an exception until you've caught it and had a chance to inspect it. For example, a wrapper for a lower-level API that uses error codes (and has zillions of them) might have a single exception class that it throws an instance of for any error, with an error_code property that can be checked to get the underlying error code. If you're only able to meaningfully handle some of those errors, then you probably want to catch, inspect, and if you can't handle the error - rethrow.
Sep
4
comment How do I see all foreign keys to a table or column?
As @Barmar says, this is entirely wrong; it will show the foreign keys belonging to the specified table, but will not show foreign keys pointing TO the table, which is what the question asks for. No idea how this got 50 upvotes; I guess people ended up here when really they were looking for the answer to the opposite question, found their answer here anyway, and didn't bother reading the original question (or even its title) before upvoting.
Sep
3
comment Get Class List for Element with jQuery
@ripper234 You mean $.fn.classList = function() {return this[0].className.split(/\s+/);};, since className is not a property of the jQuery-wrapped DOM element. Your way results in TypeError: Cannot read property 'split' of undefined. Perhaps flag and ask a mod to edit your (popular but wrong) comment?
Sep
1
comment Check if associative array contains key-value pair
@kingkero Will throw an 'Undefined offset' notice if $country isn't a key in the array.
Sep
1
comment php getimagesize() mixes width and height
Providing an example image and a short code snippet that illustrates the problem would've made this question both easier to answer and more useful to future visitors.
Aug
31
comment Should I use single or double colon notation for pseudo-element css
-1. Yes, eventually we want developers to stop using the legacy selectors (since they break the otherwise-elegant system of using single colons for pseudo-classes and double colons for pseudo-elements). However, how soon that happens is not affected at all by whether developers right now use only the single colon syntax or use both. To support legacy documents, new browsers will need to support this syntax forever anyway - but once IE 8 finally dies, web developers can abandon the single-colon syntax forever. What advantage is gained from people using both syntaxes in the interim?
Aug
31
comment Why does MySQL report a syntax error on FULL OUTER JOIN?
Note that - if you're sufficiently pedantic and theoretical - this isn't a perfect solution either. This approach (using UNION ALL but checking if one a column in one of the JOINed tables is NULL to identify that it can't be matched to any rows in the other tables) relies upon the tables actually having at least one NOT NULL column. If there's no column that is guaranteed not to actually contain a NULL, this approach won't work.
Aug
31
comment Full Outer Join in MySQL
@PavleLekic Your criticism is valid, but your 'correct' example is unclear (how do we choose which column to check for NULL in the WHERE clause?) and still fails to perfectly emulate an outer join. For example, it can fail if you have an eccentric join condition, like joining on all the columns of both tables being null.
Aug
31
comment Python - Get a list of all the encodings python can encode to
Seems to work, but note that as well as the standard encodings Python supports this also includes silly encodings like undefined (always throws an exception if you try to use it) and rot_13. I suggest just using the list of standard encodings from the docs instead.
Aug
31
comment Python - Get a list of all the encodings python can encode to
@user649198 I have no idea what you're talking about; cp1251 exists (windows-1251 is an alias of it) and is supported in Python 2.7 and Python 3.
Aug
28
comment Should I use single or double colon notation for pseudo-element css
As the other answers make clear, it's a bit more complicated than this and there are some non-obvious traps (e.g. supporting single-colon notation for CSS 3 pseudo-elements is an explicit violation of spec, so it seems wise for CSS authors not to use the single-colon notation for those selectors).
Aug
26
comment Unicode constructor will accept a unicode object, but ONLY if no kwargs are passed
@PauloScardine No, the characters used by the unicode string are entirely irrelevant to the behaviour of the above code. If it were a byte string, you would be right (e.g. unicode('foo') works but unicode('£') explodes on my system).
Aug
26
comment Unicode constructor will accept a unicode object, but ONLY if no kwargs are passed
This question is a great illustration of why I think Python's liberal attitude towards its two string types is actually evil, and what it needs is to more willing to throw exceptions, be less tolerant of mixing the two types, and always force you to explicitly specify encodings when converting. If it had got that right in the first place, libraries like lxml wouldn't have created functions that returned str or unicode unpredictably. (Forgive my ranting.) :)