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Mar
9
awarded  Scholar
Mar
9
awarded  Supporter
Mar
9
accepted Global array of vector type work-around
Mar
9
comment Global array of vector type work-around
I checked vector_functions.h for the implementation of these make_* functions. They basically declare a struct (e.g. int2), set the (x,y,z,w)-components, and then return the struct. Now I see why using make_* doesn't work. I can't really think of an alternative implementation for this like you suggest.
Mar
9
comment Global array of vector type work-around
Compiling with --ptxas-options=-v shows pretty much the same register usage with your trick, which makes me incline that your trick seems to work. Pity my current application is not yet ready for a decent benchmark, being memory-bandwidth limited and not limited in computation. Thanks for showing this nice trick. It does require PTX ISA version 2.1 or later. And yes, I am aware of the difference between const and _constant_.
Mar
8
revised Global array of vector type work-around
deleted 7 characters in body
Mar
8
comment Global array of vector type work-around
@KiaMorot: as for the point concerning _constant_ vs global. Yes, _constant_ is in general faster than global in any case. I only made that remark to prevent that people would give me the advice to use _constant_ memory for my problem.
Mar
8
comment Global array of vector type work-around
@KiaMorot: sorry for the confusion about the "global" term. What I meant is that usually you declare an array in global memory as device int2 c[9] without directly intializing it. In that case you later have intialize it, but then the compiler probably won't perform compile-time optimizations. On the other hand, if I declare an array and directly initialize it the compiler probably will perform constant folding, which effectively optimizes away the array accesses.
Mar
7
asked Global array of vector type work-around
Jan
29
awarded  Teacher
Jan
27
comment OpenGL: Rendering thousands of cubes with Vertex Arrays, not working too well
I don't know anything by heart, but try searching the web, this is fairly basic OpenGL stuff, so I would guess several examples/tutorials are online. Pick one that fits your level of expertise. OpenGL's wiki about buffer objects and vertex specification may also be useful to you: opengl.org/wiki/Buffer_Object and opengl.org/wiki/Vertex_Specification
Jan
27
comment OpenGL: Rendering thousands of cubes with Vertex Arrays, not working too well
yes. You should put a lot more cubes in a buffer. There's a certain optimum how much vertices you should store in a buffer, but you can store millions of vertices in it, which is a lot more than the handful of vertices you store in it now.
Jan
27
answered OpenGL: Rendering thousands of cubes with Vertex Arrays, not working too well
Dec
20
revised My poor design and abundance of getters
typo, fixed explanantion
Dec
20
asked My poor design and abundance of getters
Oct
8
revised Thrust - accessing neighbors
more specific about certain situation
Oct
8
answered Thrust - accessing neighbors
Oct
6
awarded  Student
Oct
6
revised Thrust - accessing neighbors
fixed small bug in provided code
Oct
5
awarded  Editor