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May
6
asked Template method pattern where each implementation requires different arguments?
May
5
awarded  Popular Question
May
2
comment Please clarify how create/update happens against child entities of an aggregate root
I'd say non trivial cases are caused by you not making Auto an Aggregate Root. An Entity has to be pretty trivial for it to not be an Aggregate itself. If Auto needs to be created by itself, than it lives on it's own, and not as a part of Policy. If Auto was just some information that only the Policy cared about, and for which the Policy was responsible, then it would make sense to have the Policy create and update and delete it.
May
2
answered Please clarify how create/update happens against child entities of an aggregate root
Apr
30
answered DDD - Dependecies between domain model, services and repositories
Apr
30
comment DDD - Dependecies between domain model, services and repositories
Actually, I misinterpreted the answer. The answer talks about having a reference to a service as a field of the Entity itself, that is, a class variable. That's obviously something you do not want ever. You do want to use double dispatch and have references to domain services as local variables inside methods of the Entity that needs it for behaviour.
Apr
30
comment DDD - Dependecies between domain model, services and repositories
Here's an example of what I meant: gorodinski.com/blog/2012/04/14/… He uses an IInvoiceNumberGenerator service inside his OrderPurchase entity to generate a unique and friendly invoice number. His Application service is responsible for creating the IInvoiceNumberGenerator and passing it to the OrderPurchase entity when it needs it.
Apr
30
comment DDD - Dependecies between domain model, services and repositories
I'm not sure I'd agree with this answer. Application Services should definitely not be referenced from an Entity. But domain services could be. This is a good example I think where you'd want your Entity to guard himself against creation of Id, so it requests an IIdGenerator or whatever, and uses it to get the Id. I don't see what's wrong with this.
Apr
24
comment How can I make a method private in an interface?
Interfaces should be seen as a mechanism to enforce the contract a class makes towards users of the class. It guarantees that X,Y,Z,... methods will always be available to be used by external users of the class. What is annoying though, is that sometimes, you want to save yourself the trouble of implementing methods that you want programmers of the class to have access to when implementing the class itself. You can do this by inheriting another concrete or abstract class, but because C# doesn't support multiple inheritance, you can not mix and match, so you'll need to resort to composition.
Mar
31
comment How to avoid anemic domain models, or when to move methods from the entities into services
@aaimnr See my answer for an alternative without domain events
Mar
31
answered How to avoid anemic domain models, or when to move methods from the entities into services
Mar
31
asked How to retrieve domain objects on indirect references? (when an entity has the Id of another entity, instead of a direct reference)
Mar
27
revised DDD: entity's collection and repositories
added 577 characters in body
Mar
27
answered DDD: entity's collection and repositories
Mar
27
comment DDD: entity's collection and repositories
@queen3 I think this guy is right. In DDD, you're aggregates should be modeled around transactional consistency boundaries and not compositional convenience. It means that either your Product must be changed transactionally with all of it's items. Meaning you would load all items as part of the object in eager loading. Or your Product does not hold a reference to the Items, but instead, an indirect reference to their Ids. In which case, I am not sure yet how you traverse that indirect reference to Item IDS from the Product, which you also ask in your question, I can't answer that part though.
Mar
19
comment dynamic or object in C#
@D.R. I can't comment on the performance. I don't know if the way C# resolves the runtime type for dynamic is slower than casting object into another type. I would hope it's about the same, but a benchmark would be nice.
Mar
19
comment dynamic or object in C#
@D.R. I highly recommend you read the msdn article I linked to, it will clear out your fears of using dynamic. Here I quote the conclusion: "there is no need to fear that someone can break your code by using dynamic features. It is no more (and again, no less) dangerous than the object keyword." [...] "if you often use the object keyword and have to perform a lot of casting and/or use reflection to call methods and properties of objects, you probably should take a look at the dynamic keyword" [...] "In some cases it’s more convenient than object and with less code to write."
Mar
19
comment dynamic or object in C#
@D.R. I see no indication of why dynamic would be worse than object. In both situations, the caller will need to be aware of the true runtime type of the value if it wants to use it. Using dynamic will clean the code from an abundance of casting and in some cases, will allow behaviour that would fail if using object.
Mar
19
answered dynamic or object in C#
Mar
18
asked ProjectReference assemblies not copied to startup project's output dir when using msbuild command line