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Jan
30
comment Is everything an object in python like ruby?
I think the common understanding is that an object is a container for methods and fields where access to those internal methods and fields is controlled by the object itself. That means, to get to execute the methods or read/write from the fields, you must ask the object to do for you. I don't know python, but it looks like it might not fit that definition. I think you could make a language where absolutely everything at run-time is like that, and all objects would be contained in a master object, so even reference equality could be a method of the master object.
Jan
20
revised how to efficiently apply a medium-weight function in parallel
Added quote from link, in case link goes down.
Jan
19
answered how to efficiently apply a medium-weight function in parallel
Jan
19
comment DyanmoDB: not getting the answer I'm expecting using batch_get_item
@DavidPelaez To get a single item you need to provide both, but to get a set of items, you can query on the first and get all items that matched ordered based on the second.
Jan
15
comment What are the Clojure time and date libraries?
Has it been modified to use Java 8 yet?
Jan
15
comment What's different between UTF-8 and UTF-8 without BOM?
Also note that Windows seem to default to using a BOM for UTF-8, and a lot of Microsoft programs to not attempt heuristic detection, so if the BOM is missing it won't decode the file properly.
Jan
15
comment What's different between UTF-8 and UTF-8 without BOM?
I've found some encoding detection libraries can only guess UTF-8 properly when a BOM is present. Otherwise, the heuristics seem to not be 100% accurate.
Jan
12
comment Why does base64 encoding requires padding if the input length is not divisible by 3?
I think this answer did in fact explain the reason as stated here: "we can no longer guarantee exact reproduction of original encoding without additional information". It's simple really, the padding let us know that we received the complete encoding. Every time you have 3 bytes, you can safely assume it's ok to go ahead and decode it, you don't worry that, hum... maybe one more byte is going to come possibly changing the encoding.
Jan
11
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
9
comment “reduce” or “apply” using logical functions in Clojure
every? is going to return a Boolean though, sometimes I use and to return the last element if all elements are true. This doesn't work with every?
Jan
9
comment “reduce” or “apply” using logical functions in Clojure
But that only works if you know the number of arguments correct?
Jan
7
comment Eclipse Counterclockwise: How do I add clojure/contrib/sql to my class path.
Should CounterClockWise load up anything that I add to the Java build Path in my Eclipse project?
Jan
7
comment Clojure differences between Ref, Var, Agent, Atom, with examples
Maybe an explanation of what Isolated with shared default means could be added to complete the answer?
Dec
15
comment How to create default value for function argument in Clojure
@XiangruLian Are you saying that when using :or, if you pass false, it will know to use false instead of the default? While with or it would use the default when passed false and not false itself?
Dec
12
comment Clojure printing functions: pr vs print
What about (str) ?
Dec
8
comment Should Private/Protected methods be under unit test?
@kai In terms of TDD tests, I believe we agree 100%. I was trying to make a distinction between testing, manual testing, automated testing and repeatable testing. The goal of testing is to assert things work. Automation can help assert that with higher confidence then manual. Repeatable tests, which is what TDD is about, has a different goal, it must assert that reusable units of code did not change behavior. This is why I mention the two class of tests: Regression and Assertion. Automation is orthogonal to both of these, and I hope my answer makes that clear.
Dec
8
comment Should Private/Protected methods be under unit test?
@kai It's not always true you can delete the code. My off by one error is a good example. It's the same code that deals with all cases, but only the edge case would reveal a flaw in its implementation. It's not always obvious to indirectly tests those edge cases, as you need to understand what input to other functions would cause the edge input to the private one. Sometimes, it's impossible, but then, someone comes in and changes the class behavior, assumes the private method to work, and suddenly, the edge case is made possible, and a bug has swooped in.
Dec
7
comment Should Private/Protected methods be under unit test?
@kai But, understand that those tests I'm talking about are not your test suite, this is not TDD. I'm saying that, some private methods are made easier to implement if you can quickly run some tests against them. In languages with a REPL, you don't need that as much. And you can try to step through the method in your head, but I'm recommending computer ran tests instead for only the difficult to implement private methods. I suggest deleting the tests afterwards, or keeping them disabled or in it's own special place that's not run in your CI build.
Dec
7
comment Should Private/Protected methods be under unit test?
@kai You mention: "or it's dead and/or untested code". Untested code is what I'm talking about. A private method could hide a lot of bugs to which the edge cases are not being exercised from the public methods. Imagine an off by one error. Sometimes, the invariants of the public methods make it so this case will never happen. In such a case, I'd consider the private method to still be buggy and have a flawed implementation, yet, its integration prevents the bug from being found and caught. In this case, you might want a few tests to try edge cases so you can be sure your method is bug free.
Dec
4
comment Should Private/Protected methods be under unit test?
@kai I explicitly state that you should not have automated tests for private methods, but it is sometimes valuable to have isolated tests to help you with implementation. Those tests should not be a part of your test suite, or should be disabled for the very reason you mentioned: refactoring. It is up to your own confidence level to decide when you prefer having a programmatic test for implementing a private method or not. Maybe you did not read till the end of my answer?