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seen May 5 at 12:15

Dec
25
asked How do keywords work in Common Lisp?
Dec
24
comment Which object the function nth access to when applied to functional argument in Common Lisp?
Thank you! That's not really functional way of dealing with lists... If I want to make everything "functional", I have to form a new list like (list (1+ (nth 0 x))) (not particularly correct, but the idea is clear), am I correct?
Dec
24
accepted Which object the function nth access to when applied to functional argument in Common Lisp?
Dec
24
comment Which object the function nth access to when applied to functional argument in Common Lisp?
Thanks, I've alreay read this. It seems I've found the reason - lists are passed by reference in CL, so that's why the original list is modified.
Dec
24
revised Which object the function nth access to when applied to functional argument in Common Lisp?
edited title
Dec
24
asked Which object the function nth access to when applied to functional argument in Common Lisp?
Dec
17
awarded  Tumbleweed
Oct
11
comment Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
That example with grammar is definitely great, thank you so much, I get everything now! I felt there is something wrong like loop in definition, but it seems alright now.
Oct
11
awarded  Supporter
Oct
10
accepted Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
Oct
10
awarded  Scholar
Oct
10
comment Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
Thank you! With these examples it seems I understand now.
Oct
10
comment Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
Then why (subtypep 'standard-class 'standard-object) gives answer true?
Oct
10
comment Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
Ok, I think I understand what metaclass is, but do we define standard-object and standard-class simultaneously? In my mind everything happens like this: 0) we define class T; 1) we define class standard-object, it is a subtype of T; there is no standard-class! 2) we define standard-class as a subtype of standard-object and make it metaclass 3) standard-object becomes an instance of standard-class Is it right? It seems a bit strange to me.
Oct
10
awarded  Editor
Oct
10
revised Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
deleted 1 characters in body
Oct
10
revised Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp
edited tags
Oct
10
awarded  Student
Oct
10
asked Hierarchy of standard-object and standard-class in Common Lisp