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bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Perth, Australia
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visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen Apr 13 at 18:20

About Me


Aug
4
comment Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
BTW - nice answer. I was thinking along similar lines, but you've put it better. One difference is that in J the fork is syntactically implicit, as are hooks. I doubt that could be emulated, and personally implicit forks and hooks seem like they are going to far to me. The other difference is the implementation which sclv covered - and J actually does handle large (and even huge) arrays quite efficiently.
Aug
4
comment Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
In addition this question now has the most upvotes in the J tag. And, I've never actually written and executed a J program. I guess I know about it though - in fact I stayed at Ken Inverson's place in Toronto for a weekend in 1995 (my dad was visiting to Ken work on J stuff, and I was doing my PhD in CMU - yeah, I guess I'm second generation PLer).
Aug
4
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
3
asked Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
Aug
3
comment What is the most concise programming language?
Are you sure that's not some kind of totem-pole smiley?
Aug
2
answered Logic variables support for .NET
Aug
1
answered Methods for side-effects in purely functional programming languages
Aug
1
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
1
answered F# vs IronPython: When is one preferred to the other?
Aug
1
answered OpenGL flickering problem
Aug
1
answered Using FreeGLUT, how can I create an OpenGL window, specifying both title and screen location?
Jul
31
answered A question about logic and the Curry-Howard correspondence
Jul
31
answered OpenGL Problems When Compiling Across Linux Distributions
Jul
31
comment What are good uses of OCaml packaged modules?
@Pascal Nice reference for the examples. That's the extension by Claudio that I mentioned.
Jul
31
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
@camccann: It's classical logic that's weird! :-) A week ago I had to do short proof in a classical logic for an equivalence in a paper, and I just couldn't get my head around the classical part and eventually I had to ask a colleague for help and he reminded me of how to do De Morgen's for implication.
Jul
31
revised What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
Added reference for more details.
Jul
31
comment F#: how to elegantly select and group discriminated unions?
@Dario You're right, I don't understand. :-) Do you mean so we can define: let categorize = (|Circle|Rectangle|) ? If so I don't see how this helps - you can simulate this by defining active versions CircleA and RectangleA, but these won't forget the radius, width and height which is exactly the point of Circular and Rectangular. How were you thinking of defining something like categorize if constructors had default active patterns?
Jul
30
comment Want tool to obtain linear temporal logic spec from UML 2.0 sequence diagram
@Charles Stewart: That link is broken now for sure.
Jul
30
comment What are the most interesting equivalences arising from the Curry-Howard Isomorphism?
I can point to published papers for each of these, so they are precisely defined. Modal logic is much studied (since Aristotle) and relates different modes of truth - "A is necessarily true" means "in every possible world A is true", while "A is possibly true" means "A is true in one possible world". You can prove things like "(necessarily(A -> B) and possibly A) -> possibly B". The modal inference rules directly yield the expression constructs, typing, and reduction rules, as usual in C-H. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modal_logic and cs.cmu.edu/~fp/papers/mscs00.pdf
Jul
30
answered Is OpenCL good for agent based simulation?