2,307 reputation
522
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Perth, Australia
age
visits member for 4 years, 11 months
seen Aug 10 at 11:14

About Me


Nov
6
comment Tools for static type checking in Python
All of the above reasons given for why Python can't have static type checking also apply to Scheme and it's descendant Racket. But optional static type checking has successfully been added to Racket while preserving the "dynamic" programming style of the language. Gradual Typing for Python (Jeremy Siek et al, mentioned in one answer, should be released soon) applies similar ideas, and more, to Python, so it can be done. I think some have misinterpreted the question as "Can all dynamic checks be replaced by static type checking?" - clearly no, even in Java static types don't do that.
Oct
16
comment Monad in non-programming terms
This doesn't really help - nearly everyone who knows what a pair of adjoint functors is knows what a monad is. And, as mentioned, in this context it's a strong monad that needs to be explained.
Apr
10
comment Is it possible to thicken a quadratic Bézier curve using the GPU only?
See my another answer - it follows on from this one, but basically I had some of the details wrong in this answer.
Apr
9
comment Is it possible to thicken a quadratic Bézier curve using the GPU only?
@zneak - actually, sorry, I misremembered the Loop-Blinn algorithm. You don't need two samplers, you just need the two sets of uv-coordinates. Basically you can make both of them "varying vec2" variables. Then you need to specify their values at each vertex - this requires taking a matrix inverse in the geometry shader to map the "texture" coordinates from one triangle to another - basically this extrapolates the Loop-Blinn coordinates to any point. The bad news is that the matrix inverse plus simple triangulation is almost certainly slower on the GPU than the CPU. But, it can be done.
Apr
6
comment Why isn't this F# inner function tail-recursive?
Function application has higher precedence than function application, so the multiplication by reflectivity is done after the recursive call in the original. So, the code in this answer doesn't calculate the same thing.
Apr
6
comment Is it possible to thicken a quadratic Bézier curve using the GPU only?
I'd add that if the width is large enough the triangulation is trivial, and even when not it can be pre-calculated. But, I think I see your issue, and I'll edit with an alternative that I think is closer to what you want.
Apr
6
comment Is it possible to thicken a quadratic Bézier curve using the GPU only?
Oh, right. I didn't interpret the "GPU only" too strictly just because the CPU at least needs to be involved in passing the control points.
Mar
29
comment Space leak in list program
@Simon Marlow: Actually a direct translation of this code to the strict language F# avoids the space leak, even using the first definition of sequence above (using a sequence comprehension). The reason is that the "sequence xss" is re-evaluated each time a new y is chosen, which is exactly what you want in this case. Is there no way in Haskell to force such re-evaluation and stick with the nice simple definition of sequence?
Aug
19
comment In computer graphics, what's the difference between a UVW mapping and a UV mapping?
This seems at odds with en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UVW_mapping which says it should map from R^2 to R^3. It's also at odds with oman3d.com/tutorials/3ds/texture_stealth, katsbits.com/tutorials/blender/… and with basically every usage of the term I found via a web search. Is the term being mostly misused? Also, for a 3D procedural texture, can't you just define it directly from the (object space) XYZ coordinates? What's the point in first transforming to UVW?
Aug
7
comment What is the technical definition of theoretical computer science? What subfields are included?
I do practical things using "theoretical" methods. I think that's pretty common - certainly it is in my field. Regarding something definitive - yes, you could be right.
Aug
7
comment What is the technical definition of theoretical computer science? What subfields are included?
I can classify most of them in a way that I'd expect some agreement on. The one's I'm most unsure of are: Data Structures and Algorithms; Computer Science and Game Theory; Cryptography and Security; Programming Languages. I guess for these I'd classify them as including some TCS and some not. When I compared my list to the Wikipedia list they were inconsistent, so I moved a few around. Overall I don't feel like I know why some fields are TCS, and others not. Many people have classified me as a theoretical computer scientist, but I claim that I'm not - am I entitled to do that?
Aug
7
comment What is the technical definition of theoretical computer science? What subfields are included?
Those seem to subfields of computer science in general. I'm asking specifically about theoretical computer science. Which of those are in TCS?
Aug
7
comment How practical is it to embed the core of a language with an effectful function space (like ML) into Haskell?
@camccann Interesting - I guess I've been testing and discovering that Stack Overflow is useful for such questions (with this one maybe pushing the limits, or just being hard to answer). I'm somewhat divided on a TCS site: I generally don't like to separate theory from practice, nor the term "theoretical". This question relates to monads, but I'm primarily asking about something of practical use. Personally I might be happier with a TCS tag on SO. Generally I think lumping things together and then projecting out subsets via tags is a better model when there's no clear dividing line.
Aug
5
comment Why is F#'s type inference so fickle?
It sounds like you're not creating VS projects for your code, or that you're leaving syntax errors in your code. As long as you don't do these, the intellisense is a massive help and will report the types of every variable on mouse hover, plus immediately indicate type errors. When I program in F# this makes me very nimble - it's a massively important feature, and the cost is just a rare use of |> and very rarely type constraints.
Aug
5
comment Why is F#'s type inference so fickle?
The ordering you prefer is most natural with call-by-name because it reflects the order of evaluation. With call-by-value the F# way is more natural - particularly since definitions may have immediate effects.
Aug
5
comment Are continuations monads?
@profjim: actually, Filinski also showed how to implement delimited continuations using ordinary continuations and state. He implemented the whole thing in SML/NJ using callcc.
Aug
5
comment How practical is it to embed the core of a language with an effectful function space (like ML) into Haskell?
A couple interesting techniques that I may try to use. It's a similar idea as in the code I gave (not surprising since Andrzej Filinski and I studied together at CMU). Also, I'd classify that embedding under "works in theory" rather than "works in practice". Plus, I guess I'd like to avoid templates for now and see what nice embeddings are possible without hacking the syntax.
Aug
4
comment Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
Very interesting - this really does seem to emulate some of the kind of things that a J interpreter does. If used in a restrained way they could lead to quite elegant code. Any idea how much these ideas are catching on in practice?
Aug
4
comment Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
BTW - nice answer. I was thinking along similar lines, but you've put it better. One difference is that in J the fork is syntactically implicit, as are hooks. I doubt that could be emulated, and personally implicit forks and hooks seem like they are going to far to me. The other difference is the implementation which sclv covered - and J actually does handle large (and even huge) arrays quite efficiently.
Aug
4
comment Have J style adverbs, forks etc been emulated via libraries in mainstream functional languages?
In addition this question now has the most upvotes in the J tag. And, I've never actually written and executed a J program. I guess I know about it though - in fact I stayed at Ken Inverson's place in Toronto for a weekend in 1995 (my dad was visiting to Ken work on J stuff, and I was doing my PhD in CMU - yeah, I guess I'm second generation PLer).