815 reputation
610
bio website getdatachops.com
location Heber City, UT
age 40
visits member for 5 years, 3 months
seen 1 hour ago

Rubyist, semweb enthusiast and machine learning hobbyist. Currently hacking on GetDataChops (data training for application developers).


Jan
27
awarded  Yearling
Jul
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
7
awarded  Yearling
Oct
14
awarded  Nice Answer
May
13
awarded  Revival
Jan
14
awarded  Critic
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
23
awarded  Yearling
May
3
awarded  Investor
May
3
awarded  Supporter
Apr
12
awarded  Yearling
Apr
10
comment Can I find another course similar to this UC Berkeley course
Good idea. This is the kind of thing that can collect some really good answers. I'd love to hear what other people have found. I found a new-to-me library since I posted that I'd like to look at: mdp-toolkit.sourceforge.net as well as the really cool wekinator wekinator.cs.princeton.edu
Apr
9
answered Can I find another course similar to this UC Berkeley course
Mar
31
comment Ranking with millions of entries
Stored procedures might be the shadow solution for something like this. I've spoken with Alistair Cockburn about how many database issues are not solved with stored procedures that maybe should be. They're not as sexy as our applications, and we don't always get to use the language of our choosing, but it simplifies some of the work and can speed up query times dramatically. If Microsoft products are a non-starter, PostgreSQL and MySQL both support stored procedures.
Mar
31
comment Ranking with millions of entries
@Naatan: you should probably check out that article. The discussion is about using Redis for a problem set of millions, which is what you're describing. Maybe one way to think of it is MySQL is optimized for set operations and Redis is optimized for fast caching of very large data sets.
Mar
29
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
26
answered Ruby on Rails: what performance can I realistically aim for?
Mar
26
comment How to calculate blocks of free time using start and end time?
What I've done with recurring appointments is build out a permanent structure for them. This way I could have more complicated recurrence patterns, a collection of recurrence records. One problem I never solved satisfactorily was extrapolating this data. The best I came up with was extracting the recurring events in a small time period like what you're thinking about. Today, I wonder about this solution. At some point, the complexity says we embrace this as a warehousing problem and use JRuby and mondrian-olap instead. Maybe that's the fallback when recurrence slows things down too much.
Mar
26
awarded  Revival