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Nov
18
comment Why doesn't boost::hash_value support boost::unordered_set by default?
@Yakk I just tested it, it actually doesn't work! If I replace hash_combine with a hash function for which order doesn't matter it actually works. From the documentation of hash_range of boost it says " hash_range is sensitive to the order of the elements so it wouldn't be appropriate to use this with an unordered container."
Nov
18
comment Why doesn't boost::hash_value support boost::unordered_set by default?
@Yakk Okay yea I get that there are efficiency concerns, but would a hash function that I suggest even work at all?
Nov
18
comment Why doesn't boost::hash_value support boost::unordered_set by default?
Would the hash function I suggested above not work because hash combine is order dependent?
Nov
18
asked Why doesn't boost::hash_value support boost::unordered_set by default?
Oct
25
comment Points-in-a-plane from HackerRank
Have you tried proving why k*(n-k)+\binom{k,2} should work?
Oct
18
answered Points-in-a-plane from HackerRank
Oct
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
13
comment HTML indenting not working in compiled Vim 7.4, any ideas?
There is something to be said for reasonable defaults in every piece of software, and I think this is a particular example where reasonable defaults failed horribly.
Oct
7
comment How to optimize Knight's tour algorithm?
I should make clear it's not equivalent to the Hamiltonian path problem but there is a reduction of the Hamiltonian path problem to the knight's tour problem which makes the knight's tour NP-hard.
Oct
7
comment How to optimize Knight's tour algorithm?
The knight's tour for a general graph is NP-hard, it's equivalent to the Hamiltonian path problem of visiting every vertex of a graph. However, for the special case of a 8x8 standard chessboard there are known linear-time algorithms. One such algorithm is described here: dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=363463. Of interest is that in the expected case, the greedy heuristic of 'We move the knight so that we always proceed to the square from which the knight will have the fewest onward moves' actually performs very well in practice: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight's_tour#Warnsdorff.27s_rule
Sep
5
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
19
comment Dijkstra's Algorithm Equal Weights
In practice, it's generally bad to have arbitrary choices, so the work around is usually to have two distance metrics that are keeping track of the distance to the current closest node. One distance metric is the primary one and the other is secondary. If the primary one is equal, then you can use the secondary distance metric to decide which edge is closer.
Jul
19
comment Given an array of numbers, return array of products of all other numbers (no division)
Substitute division with log(a/b)=log(a)-log(b) and voila!
Jul
17
comment Find the number of couples with the same difference in a sorted array
Note that the solution asks you to count the number of such couples. You do not need to enumerate all possible cases in order to count them! See Ivan's answer below.
Jul
17
comment Find the number of couples with the same difference in a sorted array
Sometimes I don't understand SO, you have the best answer by far but I think most people don't take the time to understand it so it goes ignored .... (Basically you are using a generating function to do the counting for you, a great solution.)
Jul
8
comment Multi Pattern Matching Algorithm
How about a simple backtracking algorithm to start? See the performance of that. I suspect if your input sizes are small this should suffice.
Jun
7
answered Passing an optional iterator to a function
Jun
7
comment Passing an optional iterator to a function
@KerrekSB: Can you elaborate some more on this, this looks like a promising solution?
Jun
6
asked Passing an optional iterator to a function
May
21
comment Finding intersection points between 3 spheres
This is a pretty neat way to look at it. I don't think it's less complicated than my proposed method, it simply moves the "complication" into algebraic manipulation. One thing to point out is it heavily uses the rotational symmetry of a sphere about every axis, which makes this method impossible to extend to any curves or surfaces without this property. Nice find though.