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seen Jul 20 at 2:48

NKSSS attendee


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
7
awarded  Benefactor
Jun
7
accepted R-bounded waiting for the Peterson Lock
Jun
6
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
6
comment R-bounded waiting for the Peterson Lock
@RonanThibaudau Well you're right. I can't argue that my foresight was better than your hindsight!
Jun
6
comment R-bounded waiting for the Peterson Lock
@RonanThibaudau It was, but no was answering there either. I figured there would be more people here, so the chances would be better.
May
31
comment Find 3 elements in each of 3 arrays that sum to a given value
@Suri It's shorthand for an array definition. Suppose you developed some procedure S that worked in O(n lg n) time, and that procedure, when "called" as S(A,B,C,k), finds the indices a,b,c for three arrays A,B,C such that A[a] + B[b] + C[c] = k. In other words, I'm solving 3SUM by simply calling S(s,s,s,0). No one knows if an linearithmic algorithm for 3SUM exists, so my reduction shows that finding a solution to your question is (at least) as hard as finding one for 3SUM. As I mention, it's possible to show they're actually equal problems, but that is more complicated.
May
31
accepted Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
May
31
comment Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
OK, regarding "self copying," but that's beside the point - what I'm trying to say is there's no (immediately visible) easy way to scan through a directory, which is strange, since the paper references that ability later.
May
31
awarded  Promoter
May
31
awarded  Teacher
May
31
answered Find 3 elements in each of 3 arrays that sum to a given value
May
31
comment Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
For instance, in your last example of copying /a/b/c/'s children to /a/ (note I switched the order to avoid self-copying), how would GFS get the names /a/b/c/* from its own metadata to do the snapshot? It seems that it has to traverse b/c of the design.
May
31
comment Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
Yes - that does clarify some things (please do put what you said into the answer). I understand that the commands will (somehow) read and change the lookup table, but it seems to me that with the locking procedure mentioned in the paper, this (somehow) implementation detail must be a full table traversal (which would be egregiously slow) - if GFS maintained an actual tree just to keep track of which nodes are where, it would need write locks on manipulated directories, which the paper made a point of claiming it doesn't use.
May
31
comment std::atomic_is_lock_free(shared_ptr<T>*) didn't compile
Same issue here.
May
31
comment Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
I never denied that a GFS file/directory is distinct from a Linux/Unix one. I accept that. My question is given that GFS is different, how does it execute directives that require a tree structure? In order to say, copy a subtree as you mention, does the master fully traverse the entire leaf table for all paths that match the appropriate prefix?
May
31
revised Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
edited tags
May
30
asked Does the Google File System allow listing directory contents?
May
29
comment Inheritance of Iterable
OP's own solution avoids making Bag generic.
May
28
revised R-bounded waiting for the Peterson Lock
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