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Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Nov
21
awarded  Scholar
Nov
21
accepted Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript
Nov
21
comment Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript
Looks interesting - I'll have to take a while to see if I can work out what that does! The only concern I have is that it currently requires two image tags on the page - but I'm sure that I can use the same tag swapping logic I have in my current solution as well as the Deferreds to get the best of both :) Thanks for the tips :)
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
let us continue this discussion in chat
Nov
21
awarded  Commentator
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
Maybe we have a different version of .net? I'm using .net4 and I can use c# properties in a LINQ-to-SQL expression without issue. I can create a property along the lines of public bool IsRejected { get {return Status!="rejected"; } } to get a similar effect. (although I'm not sure if this is evaluated in SQL or in code - so the performance difference could be significant in some cases)
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
It's an interesting idea - but I'm concerned about moving logic to the DB as this complicates the testing and readability - a developer coming to make a change would then need to dig through to find the bits of SQL being used and there's a risk of looking at the wrong dev database or something and getting confused. If it were systematic across the whole development it might be a plan, but in a individual case, although it makes the code slightly nicer it does so at the cost of quite a bit of additional complexity.
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
True - that particular check could be simplified - that's the trouble with inventing examples ;) I guess that level of simplifcation is a good first step, but doesn't really address the wider requirement for a more readable and testable way to code complicated clauses. Isn't the computed column limited to the scope of the table? If so, it cannot handle any context data and so, other than in a possible performance variation I'm not sure how it's different from using a public property in c#. A property could be used to simplify the example slightly - but not to the same extent as object methods.
Nov
21
awarded  Supporter
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
I have the latest version of Resharper, but this kind of LINQ query is outside of the scope of any refactoring options I can find. The null checks in this case are not to prevent null reference exceptions but to filter for values that exist or don't exist - therefore these can't be removed without changing the meaning of the clause. Unless it was to address a significant performance issue, I'm not sure that moving sections of the logic to the DB is a good idea as this adds additonal complexity and maintainance concerns. The key is to make the LINQ easy to read, understand, and test.
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
I think this is a step in the right direction - but it's still pretty difficult to see what's going on... it would be worse if the bottom level operator was 'OR' because this technique wouldn't help at all. The LINQ-to-gubbins version is much easier to read and each of the methods can have simple, testable condition in them and so it's easy to verify that the results are correct. Is there no way to get this seperation with LINQ-to-SQL?
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
I think moving the conditional clauses to a stored procedure only shifts the problem into the DB. It may be possible to make the conditions easier to read there, but I think the added level of complexity will only make readability worse because then you'd need to go poking about in the database to find out what's going on (and the same code might run against different databases so there may also be all kinds of other maintainance issues ensuring that the stored proc is in sync with the build)
Nov
21
comment How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
@TimSchmelter - good point - amended
Nov
21
asked How to simplify complicated conditional clauses when using LINQ to SQL
Nov
15
answered Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript
Nov
15
comment Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript
No joy :( This seems like a reasonable plan for helping minimize the browser's workload, but I'm still not sure that's the route to go - as a side note, I've noticed this kind of re-draw flicker often happens in default Win Forms controls on resize events. With the jQuery animation effects I'm sure it should be possible to load both the existing and the updated images and then fade between them before discarding the original. I'm just not experienced enough with jQeury to get the best technique - I'd probably end up with a bunch of ugly html markup that wasn't actually needed.
Nov
14
comment Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript
Interesting idea. I've tried this out and sadly it's not noticably different from the version which replaces the whole img tag. I think the issue relates to the actual rendering of the new image by the browser (the flicker becomes far more obvious as the image dimensions increase). I still have a feeling that the solution is related to rendering the image transparent and then fading it in rather than trying to speed up the swapping.
Nov
14
awarded  Student
Nov
14
asked Smoothly replace image when reloading with javascript