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Jan
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
11
comment Reference Implementation for IFormattable
When I first read this question I was basically as confused about all of this as you were, so I Looked at the framework in reflector, and started reading MSDN pages, and I only got more confused. It took ontil I had read the majority of the MSDN pages before I found that main reference page. Even then, It took a while before it started to click. There are some tricky parts. For example, I suspect the only reason ICustomFormatter is used with IFormatProvider is because it was a late addition to the 1.0 framework, and they did not want to add a new string.Format overload.
Jan
10
answered Reference Implementation for IFormattable
Jan
9
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
3
comment Operator (*) Cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'double'
@AndrewBarber: Actually the problem is not so much using floating point to represent money, as using binary floating point rather than decimal floating point. After all, you are not likely to be dealing with sums of money so large that the floating nature of the point will matter. The problem is that binary floating point cannot exactly represent values that are likely to come up when dealing with money (and these are values our base-10 intuition tells us are exact). Also the rules for rounding are unlikely to do what you want for monetary values.
May
2
comment How to translate “default(SomeType)” from C# to CIL?
@stakx: Yes and no. The use of generics is the only way to make things truely general. If you don't use generics, but use specific types the compiler will generally emit initobj for non-"built-in" value-types, ldnull for reference types, and specilized code for "built-in" value-types.
May
2
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
1
comment How to translate “default(SomeType)” from C# to CIL?
@stakx: The important parts are scattered throughout the specification, but basically the verifier does static type analysis using some rather convoluted rules. These rules distinguish between boxed and unboxed types for type parameters, and the rules do not take into account the fact that the 'class' contrstraint statically proves that the runtime boxed type will be the same as the runtime unboxed type. Basically, the program in question is both valid and typesafe, but the verifier is too simplistic to realize that.
Apr
30
comment C# and the mischief of floats
@phoog: Lastly it is rather rare for arithmatic on decimals to be the bottleneck in an application, so going with doubles because they are faster is premature optimization. Writing a forms-over-data GUI application in assembly because it is faster sounds absurd right? Well while that is an extreme case of premature opimization, the same basic logic should apply to this.
Apr
30
comment C# and the mischief of floats
@phoog: It is entirely possible to use double for currency, as long as you truely understand that double is a base-2 float point number based on IEEE 754, and all that entails. Some results are surprising. For example, if x is a double, it is legal for x!=x to be true, even when x is not NaN. (This is due to the arules surounding extended precision.) It is very tricky to reason about doubles. Decimals tend be be easy to reason about, as rounding and exactness tend to match your intuition.
Apr
30
comment Events aren't fields - I don't get it
@Dhananjay Events must use delegates in some way, since they are implemented as a pair of methods (add and remove) that take a delegate as a parameter. However they are not required to map directly onto a delegate field. Instead they may store the delegates in some other manner, or they might create a wrapper delegate and store that instead, etc. Users of the class should not be able to tell the difference between an auto-event that uses a delgate backing field, and a custom coded event, so reasonable implementation options are a bit limited.
Apr
26
revised C# calling C function that returns struct with fixed size char array
Switch to showing second (safer) alternative by default.
Apr
26
comment C# calling C function that returns struct with fixed size char array
If there is any possibility that there will not be a null character, then you should use the 2nd option I show, which does use that overload. Unfortunately AFAICT that overload will always create a string of 128 characters, instead of stopping at the first NULL. That is why I added the split on the null character, and selecting the first result.
Apr
25
revised C# calling C function that returns struct with fixed size char array
deleted 30 characters in body
Apr
25
answered C# calling C function that returns struct with fixed size char array
Apr
18
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
16
comment Wrong overload is overridden when two methods have identical signatures after substitution of type arguments
Also, I believe that the unifying is actually undefined behavior, not Implementation-defined since the CLI spec simply says the class is "invalid", which would mean the implementation is not required to document what it does. Documenting the behavior is part of the definition of implementation-defined (in C++) and implementation-specific (in ECMA CIL).