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Oct
17
comment Exporting dll functions to unmanaged programs
@HansPassant: (Continued). Chapter 18 of "Expert .NET 2.0 IL Assembler" describes this is slightly more detail, although I suspect better books exist.
Oct
17
comment Exporting dll functions to unmanaged programs
@HansPassant: You have have found out in the over 2 years since that comment, but if not, It works using the the frameworks reverse P/Invoke support. (This makes your assembly platform-specific.) Basically in IL you can add .export [1] to a method to export a method in slot one of the unmanaged export table. A marshaling thunk gets generated at runtime. Use the normal marshaling attributes like you would with forward P/Invoke to customize the effective native signature. The .export clause also takes an optional 'as exported_name' clause to allow you to set the name in the export table.
Aug
25
comment Why is a nested struct inside a generic class considered “managed”?
The fact that the class is generic may be made more clear by the syntax used by MSIL, namely: "Outer`1/Inner<T>". Specifically the type parameters are all actually at the most nested level. It is possible at the MSIL or reflection.emit level to create a non-generic class nested in Outer<T>, but C# does not permit that, and would porbably have trouble referencing such a type.
Aug
19
comment Testing if object is of generic type in C#
@JonSkeet: Why is it really tricky? My brief testing suggests that adding foreach(var i in type.GetInterfaces()) if(i.IsGenericType && i.GetGenericTypeDefinition()==genericType) return true;, right before the while loop appears to work just fine. Am I overlooking some odd edge case?
Jun
20
comment Java Naming Convention with Acronyms
@JCoombs: Well, the inconsistancy for 2 letters is to something like IpAddress which looks terrible to many people. Personally when I need to write Java code, I go with mixed case for the 3 letter acronyms, leaving only the two letters as a special case.
Jun
18
comment Open Windows Explorer to a Combined-GUID folder
I'm pretty sure the general rule is that Uou specify A legal heieracy and it works. For example, you can specify just shell:::{93412589-74D4-4E4E-AD0E-E0CB621440FD} to have no problem, although it would be odd for that "folder" to lack a parent. You can specify programs and features as shell:::{26EE0668-A00A-44D7-9371-BEB064C98683}\8\::{7B81BE6A-CE2B-4676-A29E-EB9‌​07A5126C5}, or using just the last guid. Change the 8 to a 6 and you get a displa path of Control Panel\Clock, Language, and Region\Programs and Features! But the Fonts folder is just weird.
Jun
12
comment How does the C preprocessor handle circular dependencies?
@Lundin: Whoa! I for one totally missed the existence of TC3. Its existence shocks me, since the current ISO directive 2.10.4 prohibits more than 2 TCs. I guess that is a new rule. Anyway, if Eric also missed that, and felt that referring to a C99 document was more appropriate (having been the controlling standard for longer than C11, then his choice of link is understandable, since that draft is publically available, and is consolidated, unlike the offical TC2, which is a royal pain to use unless you use it (and TC 1) to hand correct a printed copy of C99.
Mar
19
comment Is it ever OK to *not* use free() on allocated memory?
Sure, but shared libraries are not even considered by the language standards to begin with, so using them is undefined behavior. Reasonably sized applications running under windows will often have a minumum of two different malloc implementations, which may but are not required to co-operate. Further, even under linux programs and shared libraries are free to use a C library other than libc.so, such as a static libc, or alternate implementation. It can be really, really annoying/expensive to fix when a library makes this assumption, but the environment does not permit it.
Mar
19
comment Is it ever OK to *not* use free() on allocated memory?
@PlasmaHH: While freeing in the same compilation unit is not required, the free really should be in the same library as the allocation, possibly by explicitly exposing a deallocator. That is especially true of shared libraries. Assuming that the "free" of the base program is compatible with the "malloc" used in a library is not safe. It also can result in being unable to use an API from a different language without leaking memory, since those languages may not have access to the same "free".
Dec
18
comment How to find the lowest common ancestor of two nodes in any binary tree?
@ALBI O(h) is only O(log(n)) if the tree is balanced. For any tree, be it binary or not, if you have parent pointers you can determine the path from a leaf to the root in O(h) time, simply by following the parent pointer up to h times. That gives you the path from the leaf to the root. If the paths are stored as a stack, then iterating the stack gives you the path from root to leaf. If you lack parent pointers, and have no special structure to the tree, then finding the path from root to leaf does take O(n) time.
Sep
30
comment What is normalized UTF-8 all about?
You might think that, but from the annex: "To transform a Unicode string into a given Unicode Normalization Form, the first step is to fully decompose the string". Thus even wehn running NFC, Q-Caron would first become become Q+Caron, and could not recompose, since the stability rules prohibit adding the new composition mapping. NFC is effectively defined as NFC(x)=Recompose(NFD(x)).
Jun
6
comment Why does the is operator return false when given null?
Eric turned this into a blog post: ericlippert.com/2013/05/30/what-the-meaning-of-is-is
Apr
30
comment If Int32 is just an alias for int, how can the Int32 class use an int?
I think it is worth noting that m_value is used in the source code, quite a bit actually. However the compiler's IL emitter has a special rule that replaces any use of the recursive in a recursive valuetype with a use of the parent object instead. Of course the CLR will refuse not load such a recursive valuetype, except for the built-in ones.
Jan
28
comment C++ - Incorrect ASCII value (“ë”)
I came across it when tracing an interesting hack that relied on this, and came across a class with a method with 3 overloads, one on char*, one on unsigned char*, and one on signed char*. Needless to say that shook me, since I had been following C++0x development very closely (reading and understanding most working papers) and felt that I knew the language very well.
Jan
28
comment C++ - Incorrect ASCII value (“ë”)
Yes. The 3 distinct char variants is something that is very easy to overlook, since many textbooks/classes never bother to mention it. I also find it interesting that the C standard also goes out of its way to say the same thing. See C11 6.2.5.14-15. From 6.2.5.15: "The implementation shall define char to have the same range, representation, and behavior as either signed char or unsigned char", then the footnote which reads in part "Irrespective of the choice made, char is a separate type from the other two and is not compatible with either." C99 has simlar text.
Jan
28
comment properties in C#
No, there is no way to directly access the autogenerated field. When the property is not virtual, it would be legal for the compiler to write code that directly accesses the field when used in the same class, but the current compiler does not do so. Do note however, that the JIT is extremly likely to inline the varname_get method, which makes using it no slower than directly using the field. (Again, unless the auto-property is virtual).
Jan
24
comment Trying to understand why resharper told me expression is always false
Yeah and I noticed your edit right after I posted my answer. Go figure! :-)
Jan
11
comment Reference Implementation for IFormattable
When I first read this question I was basically as confused about all of this as you were, so I Looked at the framework in reflector, and started reading MSDN pages, and I only got more confused. It took ontil I had read the majority of the MSDN pages before I found that main reference page. Even then, It took a while before it started to click. There are some tricky parts. For example, I suspect the only reason ICustomFormatter is used with IFormatProvider is because it was a late addition to the 1.0 framework, and they did not want to add a new string.Format overload.
May
3
comment Operator (*) Cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'double'
@AndrewBarber: Actually the problem is not so much using floating point to represent money, as using binary floating point rather than decimal floating point. After all, you are not likely to be dealing with sums of money so large that the floating nature of the point will matter. The problem is that binary floating point cannot exactly represent values that are likely to come up when dealing with money (and these are values our base-10 intuition tells us are exact). Also the rules for rounding are unlikely to do what you want for monetary values.
May
2
comment How to translate “default(SomeType)” from C# to CIL?
@stakx: Yes and no. The use of generics is the only way to make things truely general. If you don't use generics, but use specific types the compiler will generally emit initobj for non-"built-in" value-types, ldnull for reference types, and specilized code for "built-in" value-types.