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Jul
4
comment Annoying bug in python. (0.3 + 0.3 + 0.3 = 0.899999…)
@Lightness Races in Orbit - of course, but he's not the only person here. The @ helps people find which comment I'm reacting to - sometimes aiming the comment at someones inbox is just an unfortunate side-effect. Sorry for any accidental implications, though, especially as I often get grumpy over that kind of thing myself.
Jul
4
comment Annoying bug in python. (0.3 + 0.3 + 0.3 = 0.899999…)
@Martijn Pieters - I know what you mean by "approximations", but there's pedanting arguments to be made. In this case, certainly you can only get an approximation of 0.9, 0.3 or 0.1 - these have infinite "recurring" representations in binary, just like a third has an infinite recurring representation in decimal.
Jul
2
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Jul
2
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Jul
1
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Jun
19
comment convert min heap to binary search tree
There's a proof that you can't sort a sequence of items (using only relative operators and item moves) in better than O(n log n) time. When I thought there might be a way to convert a heap to a BST in O(n) time it was because a heap is already structured based on ordering. With a binary heap that's not good enough, but I thought there might be an alternative heap where it was good enough. Sadly it looks like no. Anyway, given that a heapify is O(n), if you could extract all items from a binary heap in order in O(n) time you could sort the array in O(n) time which is impossible.
Jun
19
comment convert min heap to binary search tree
@littlerunaway - you don't necessarily need a sorted array, but you do need to be able to get the items in sorted order. A binary heap provides that, but each item costs O(log n), so getting all n of them is O(n log n). If you're thinking of the binary heap being stored in an array, and sorting it to get the items in order, consider that the heap sort algorithm sorts an array by (1) heapifying, then (2) repeatedly extracting the next item in order from the heap and placing it in the space in the array freed by that heap extraction.
Jun
18
comment convert min heap to binary search tree
BTW - the heap data structure I was thinking of is the Fibonacci heap. Unfortunately, it turns out the delete-min operation is O(log n) amortized time, so you can't get the O(n) performance - only O(n log n) which you could get from a binary heap anyway. Some other operations are amortized O(1) time, but you'd need delete-min to remove each min.
Jun
18
comment convert min heap to binary search tree
Amortized O(1) is sort-of constant-on-average, but that's a pretty vague intuition for a more formal thing. When you do n operations with amortized O(1) complexity, you end up with genuine (not amortized) O(n). The way I remember one argument is basically budgeting so you never go overdrawn. In this case you'd budget some constant amount of work per operation and, though the actual cost per operation varies, you prove you can never go overdrawn. Thus for the full sequence of n operations you cannot have total costs more than n times the O(1) you budgeted for - a genuine O(n) complexity.
Jun
18
comment convert min heap to binary search tree
If you have the items in order, you can create a binary tree in O(n) time. So it depends on whether you can extract all the items (in order) from the min heap in O(n) time. IIRC for a binary heap it takes O(n log n) time, but the binary heap isn't the only heap/priority queue data structure. I seem to remember there being a heap that supports amortized O(1) extractions, which should mean you get O(n) total for extracting everything - I forget which one. If I'm right, yes, you can convert from that specific min heap data structure to a binary tree in O(n) time.
Jun
14
revised How can I better understand the one-comparison-per-iteration binary search?
added 71 characters in body
Jun
14
revised How can I better understand the one-comparison-per-iteration binary search?
Bounds are not items
Jun
12
comment How does using log10 correctly calculate the length of a integer?
I asked this relevant question - not a duplicate - on Mathematics a few years back. Strictly speaking, using log10 doesn't work - at least not using floating point. For a large enough number, the inaccuracy in the logarithm will be sufficient that your result can be out by any number of digits you choose. You can't experience this with int though - you'd have to be using a big-integer type.
May
23
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May
22
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May
18
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May
8
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May
2
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Apr
30
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Apr
8
comment ansi-terminal: unexpected behavior on Windows
Many years ago, it was possible to configure support for ANSI escape sequences in MS DOS by setting up the ANSI.SYS driver (probably in CONFIG.SYS, but my memory has limits). I'm pretty sure that worked in 16-bit Windows and Windows 95/98 too. I don't think I've ever seen escape sequences used in XP onwards and I don't even know if it's possible. There was certainly a perception that terminal emulation was an inefficient and limited legacy trick even back in the DOS days, though the alternative was to get direct access to screen memory or use a non-portable library that did that for you.