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23h
comment optimal for MIN in minimax
There's an MIT OpenCourseware course 6.034 Artificial Intelligence, with videos and other materials available. Lecture 6 covers minimax and alpha-beta, with a blackboard walkthrough of how it's done. In the materials, MIT6_034F10_tutor02.pdf gives minimax pseudocode etc. IIRC, the "both to play optimally" confusion is covered indirectly in the video - in an adversarial situation each player only gets the best result he can force - this is still an optimum.
1d
comment Compiling C code using multiple compilers
On undefined behavior - if you have old-style data structure code with lots of pointer casts, it's very easy for that to have undefined behavior. Specifically, the compiler may not spot that two pointers are actually the same pointer. This pointer alias issue can lead to references via one pointer failing to see changes written via the other. It's actually newer and better compilers that tend to get the bugs - more sophisticated optimization tends to find bugs. In this case, alias pointers aren't a (visible) bug if every read/write is forced to main memory - it's just slow.
1d
comment Compiling C code using multiple compilers
It can be a tad painful keeping multiple compilers up to date with lots of libraries (your own and third party) built for each etc. It's worth looking at tools like cmake, which can build via multiple compilers. That's not a magic everything-done-for-you solution, but it can help. I used to switch back-and-forth between MinGW GCC and VC++ a lot a few years back. I still use cmake even just using GCC.
2d
awarded  Yearling
Sep
25
comment Find the shortest path in a 2D plane
"Don't use a graph" could be a pretty extreme restriction, depending on how it's interpreted. Every data structure that uses pointers can be considered a graph - specifically a digraph in which the data structure nodes are the nodes/vertices and the pointers are the edges. For example quadtrees are a particular kind of tree, which are a particular kind of graph.
Sep
22
comment c++ cannot print escape character
Are you sure the data stream is being directed to the right place in time? One obvious explanation would be if the terminal (or some Linux service) were getting confused by the escape sequence.
Sep
22
comment in programming how do codes you write show graphics?
There's so much history and so many layers of complexity in something like that, though, that truth is that virtually no-one understands the full story. For example, as Chantola says, SDL is one library to handle a big chunk of this so most programmers don't need to. SDL uses DirectX or OpenGL (and more) to do the bits it can't do. DirectX uses graphics drivers to do the bits it can't do, and so on.
Sep
22
comment in programming how do codes you write show graphics?
The size of a sprites head is determined by the artist and the graphics program, and recorded in the graphics file (or perhaps a level file holding lots of graphics and other data). Very simply, a file format is how information is organized in a file. The "codes" (very simply) are instructions that tell the computer how to understand the file format, read the file, keep the data in memory, and draw it on the screen when needed. How the computer can read and understand that code (at least in its "machine code" form) is built into the machine by the wizards of Intel and AMD.
Sep
22
revised Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
Removed inappropriate cut from one case
Sep
22
comment Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
@Paulo - I've been congratulating myself for working out that there is no backwards evaluation in Prolog even though it's sometimes described that way - just forwards evaluation using a method that can solve for different choices of unknowns - so I really should have considered the case of solving for all arguments unknown and noticed this earlier. Of course I'm ignoring any seemingly-backward-evaluation effects from backtracking and focusing on unification.
Sep
22
comment Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
@Paulo - I tried to fix the problem a few ways. One very-quickly-proved-futile approach was with cuts (but how to decide when to cut?). That one case, though, looked completely safe at the time - knowing either argument and getting a match is sufficient to prove the other cases don't apply (neither height 0 nor stubs). Of course the fallacy there (as mats answer strongly hints) is that both arguments may validly be unknown, so now I think about it that way, that cut shouldn't be there.
Sep
22
accepted Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
Sep
22
comment Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
That's interesting. There's no sign of that in my (very old second hand) books, but as it's a library/extension I guess that's no surprise. By "fair enumeration" point, you mean so the solutions come in order of increasing size or increasing height? Something that means you don't have to do infinite enumerating just to find all the small solutions?
Sep
22
asked Trying to write a tree-height predicate - do I need Peano-style natural numbers?
Sep
19
comment Are llvm-gcc and clang binary compatible with gcc? - particularly mingw gcc on Windows
Accept switched based on popular opinion. As far as I recall, I didn't really get an answer I was fully happy with, so just accepted anything that wasn't my own non-answer. As this answer seems most useful to others, though, it should probably be accepted.
Sep
19
accepted Are llvm-gcc and clang binary compatible with gcc? - particularly mingw gcc on Windows
Sep
15
comment Benefits of inline functions in templates
@the swine - Yes, sorry, I think no but I don't really know. You're test in your answer is (as you say at the end) suggestive but not definitive.
Sep
15
answered Benefits of inline functions in templates
Sep
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
5
comment “Type” does not refer to a value on C++
Not the problem, but in C and C++, identifiers starting with an underscore (or containing a double-underscore) are reserved. If you use them and get unlucky, you can get clashes with compiler-specific keywords, standard library internals etc. A single trailing underscore (e.g. hello_) is OK. It's a mistake I used to make a lot years ago, having looked at compiler-supplied header files and thinking they were a good example to imitate. If you want a naming convention for parameters, the most common seem to use pname, p_name, pName etc. Prefixes using m for class members are common too.