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Apr
19
comment Identifying cheapest path with A* algorithm
@user2787386 - OK, that means your cost function needs to be something a bit less obvious. A diagonal move is always (much) less than the horizontal and vertical steps to reach the same position, so the easiest way to find a valid lower bound on distance remaining is to base it on diagonal steps. Basically, imagine your grid rotated 45 degrees, then compute Manhattan/Euclidean distances based on those grid lines. If you also think of it as a chess-board with bishop moves, the diagonal-only moves only access half the nodes though.
Apr
19
comment Is it ever okay to format any part of the contents of an 'if' statement on the same line as the if statement itself?
For me the most important style rule you'll find for Python or anything else - in PEP 8, A Foolish Consistency is the Hobgoblin of Little Minds - "sometimes the style guide just doesn't apply. When in doubt, use your best judgment".
Apr
19
comment Is it ever okay to format any part of the contents of an 'if' statement on the same line as the if statement itself?
One issue with that logic - if condition : isn't a complete statement. if condition : whatever() is actually one compound statement. Sure it contains another simpler statement - that's what compound statements do. It's similar to the fact that the list [1,2,3] is a single value - it contains three other values but is still one compound value.
Apr
19
revised Identifying cheapest path with A* algorithm
added 781 characters in body
Apr
19
revised Identifying cheapest path with A* algorithm
added 329 characters in body
Apr
19
revised Identifying cheapest path with A* algorithm
added 443 characters in body
Apr
19
answered Identifying cheapest path with A* algorithm
Apr
18
awarded  Informed
Apr
12
comment What is “Asymptotically tight time complexity”? Is this code's time complexity asymptotically tight?
"Tightness" is a property of the bound, not of the code. If the same bound is both an upper bound and a lower bound, it's a tight bound. For example if the time complexity is at most linear and at least linear, you have a tight bound. If you only know an upper bound, it might turn out that there's a smaller upper bound that you didn't know. If the upper bound is also the lower bound that can't happen - there's no chance your upper bound is too high (or your lower bound is too low) so it's a tight bound.
Apr
7
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
6
awarded  Caucus
Apr
6
comment Is there a regular expression to detect a valid regular expression?
There are many notations for regular expressions - some features and their spellings are common to most, some are spelled differently or only available in one particular notation. Most of those notations aren't "regular" in the regular grammar sense - you'd need a context free parser to handle the unbounded nesting of subexpressions - though many modern "regular expression" notations have extensions that go beyond the original formal definition and might allow their own notations to be recognized. In any case, why not simply ask your regex library if each regex is valid?
Apr
2
comment How to implement garbage collection in C++
I didn't really believe this choice between RAII and GC was necessary even when I wrote this, but with the mainstream languages (and even most less-than-mainstream languages) currently available...
Apr
2
comment How to implement garbage collection in C++
A sufficiently powerful static type-system could manage that, maintaining compile-time proofs that cycles can only occur where valid so the reference-cycle issue never happens where any more complex cleanup is needed than freeing memory, but it doesn't happen in mainstream languages. I know (only just) enough about dependently typed languages to know that in principle one should be able to do it, but the programmer would have to write all the "proofs".
Apr
2
comment How to implement garbage collection in C++
@supercat - personally, I would focus on the fact that reference cycles rarely if ever exist except as part of data structures. Even structures that, based on static types, could have reference cycles but never do in practice rarely occur except for data structures. Basically, there seems to be a need for potentially-cyclic references to objects that only (directly) manage memory and non-cyclic references to objects that may manage any resource.
Mar
30
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
10
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
22
comment Find largest square in matrix that can move from one corner to the other
It looks like a search problem - consider all possible squares you can form at (0,0) and, for each, search for a path to the opposite corner. The search can be optimized using dynamic programming. Have a can-reach-the-bottom-right-from-here table. At each location, if a square can be placed there and one of the locations one step right or down is already flagged in the table, flag this cell too. If you start with the largest possible square (4,4) and count down each time one is disproven, the first one you find is the solution you need.
Feb
20
comment How to count the number of characters entered in a char array in C
Looks like there's some misleading indentation in the first while loop - the end brace that looks like it ends the while actually only ends the else for the if(ch == EOF). Presumably that's why there's two braces at the end of the function.
Feb
4
revised modify binary search to find the next bigger item than the key
Non-deletable bad answer warning