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Jan
26
comment Swapping 2 Bytes of Integer
Some advice - when bit-fiddling, it's a good idea to use unsigned integer types. C doesn't guarantee that signed integers will use any particular representation - without a clear definition of how numbers translate to/from bits, bit-fiddling is very bug-prone. In practice the representation will be twos complement for any not-completely-strange platform, but compilers are increasingly exploiting undefinedness for optimization reasons. So even though you know your platform uses twos complement you may get behavior that's inconsistent with that, depending on the whims of your compiler.
Jan
20
revised Fill the area between two lines (not straight)
added 317 characters in body
Jan
20
comment Fill the area between two lines (not straight)
This is a very direct implementation of the even/odd winding rule.
Jan
20
answered Fill the area between two lines (not straight)
Jan
19
answered Is it possible to crack SHA256, when you know the answer is a coordinate?
Jan
16
comment Best way to find if path exists in a unidirectional directed graph
WRT larsmans suggestion, Dijkstra is a priority-order search which visits the vertices nearest to the starting vertex (by number of edges distance) first. One alternative, even if you can't use A*, is to have a priority-order search that expands outwards from both the start and end points until a vertex is encountered in both searches - expanding out from both points until you meet in the middle. You can imagine this as two circles expanding until they collide - the sum of the areas will be less that for one circle expanding around the start until it hits the end.
Jan
16
comment Best way to find if path exists in a unidirectional directed graph
@user1429322 - are you sure you don't have a potential heuristic? IIRC A* doesn't require your nodes to have a position in a road-map style Euclidian space - it only requires a metric space. Of course plenty of graphs don't have any such heuristic available as they're not associated with anything you could call a space, but I thought it was worth double checking.
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
10
awarded  Great Answer
Jan
9
revised Clean ways to write multiple 'for' loops
Forgot the `auto` for the loop variable
Jan
8
answered Clean ways to write multiple 'for' loops
Jan
3
revised What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
added 130 characters in body
Jan
3
comment Why doesn't my Python Fibonacci sequence work properly? [Project Euler #25]
Extra note - there are two versions of the Fibonacci series, both identical except that one includes an initial 0. OP seems to be generating that at first sight, but the question seems to require the older one that doesn't include the 0. It makes no difference if the answer is the 1000-digit number, but choosing the wrong one will give an out-by-one error for the n.
Jan
3
comment What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
Nice explanation - thanks.
Jan
3
accepted What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
Jan
3
comment What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
@Mitch - I should also mention - there are very few small files to worry about.
Jan
3
comment What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
@Mitch - it depends what you plan to use it for. This is as the (possibly first stab) at detecting and tracking duplicate files. Some of the files will be a few GB, but even so, the probability of being misled by hash collisions is fairly low - especially when also recording file sizes, so the hash is a tie-breaker for equal-size files. Also, collisions are non-fatal - the hash is an indicator, not taken as the final word.
Jan
3
comment What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
@Mitch - that's why this is mostly out of interest - I doubt I really need it, but I got curious. I'll be hashing the content of multiple several-terabyte USB2 hard drives, which will take days, but I only need to resume at the file level - not partial files.
Jan
3
comment What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?
@Mitch - you can perform the computation for e.g. the first half of a large file, then save the state of the computation. Then later, you can load that state and resume the computation, deriving the same hash for the whole file that you would have if you had done the job in one go. If you have very large files that can only be accessed via a slow and/or unreliable connection, that can be useful.
Jan
3
asked What state needs to be stored to allow resumable hash computations?