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seen Mar 18 at 22:34

Feb
24
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
5
comment Given 2 arrays, find the minimal sum of multiplication of indexes
@JuanLopes Yeah, I'm only hand-waving in the direction of a proof, not giving a rigorous proof, itself. But I think you can get there from the impossibility of any rearrangement of partners to reduce the sum, perhaps combined with the impossibility of any other arrangement to have that same property (suppose one is sorted and the other is in some other order producing a lower sum, then show when that other order is not the reverse sort order that there must exist a swap which can lower the sum, and thus was not a local minimum; the only local minimum is sorted/reverse-sorted or equivalent).
Feb
4
comment Given 2 arrays, find the minimal sum of multiplication of indexes
To prove that multiplying them by reverse sorted order gives the lowest possible sum assume that there exist two pairs for which swapping their partners could reduce the sum, then use the known sort order of each array to prove that any such swap would have to increase the sum (or stay the same, in some cases). Basically, prove that multiplying the two larger numbers together and the two smaller numbers together would produce a larger sum than doing larger-to-smaller for any given 2-element arrays whose partners you might swap. Thus there can be no such pairs to swap to make the sum smaller.
Feb
4
comment Given 2 arrays, find the minimal sum of multiplication of indexes
I think it works with negatives, too. They will tend to pair with a positive and create a negative product which creates the smallest (most negative) sum.
Jan
21
awarded  Good Question
Dec
11
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
awarded  Curious
Nov
4
comment Why does this program print “forked!” 4 times?
Hmm, I may have misunderstood the other comments, but it sounded like @AmitSinghTomar was getting 16 lines printed from the original program. The key point is whether && has higher priority than || (as in C#) and forces grouping as (fork() && fork()) || fork() or they have equal priority (and from right to left as I recall) grouping it as fork() && (fork() || fork()). The former grouping would split into 5 processes (or 20 total) while the latter grouping would only split into 4 (or 16 total). Unfortunately, I don't have a C compiler handy to test it.
Nov
4
comment Why does this program print “forked!” 4 times?
What about the values returned by each call to fork()? How about: long f1,f2,f3; (f1 = fork()) && ((f2 = fork()) || (f3 = fork())); and then print the PID and the three individual values.
Nov
4
comment Why does this program print “forked!” 4 times?
Without any parentheses you may be parsing the logical tree incorrectly. Doesn't the false (0) path from the first fork() cause the entire expression to be short-circuited at the &&? I think the associativity priority of && and || in C are from right to left so that a simple evaluation from left to right can short-circuit the rest of the sub-expression (within any containing parentheses). It's the same as fork() && (fork() || fork()) This would then explain the 4 (not 5) processes from this line alone and 16 total. It may be different in C++ or C#, but this question was in C.
Nov
3
asked Has the actual behavior of FileStream.Lock(long, long) (or of the WINAPI method LockFile) changed since .NET 2.0 was originally released, and how?
Oct
28
comment Read Only filestream seems to lock file on network share
It's been many months so you may no longer care, but some more information would be needed such as how the previewer opens and closes the file (is it the same pattern as your repro code or is the repro just what fails to open?) and do you mean that two previewers are not able to overlap their reading or do you mean that even after closing (and disposing) another process is still unable to open the file some time later? Or is another process failing to open for writing while a previewer still has it open for reading? Also, what is the OS of the network share?
Aug
26
comment TripleDES key sizes - .NET vs Wikipedia
@dave_thompson_085 thanks for the clarification on the standardization with EDE. On the parity bit, it would be pretty lousy if the software implementation (translating into possible hardware implementation) took the upper 7 bits of each provided byte when there is more entropy in the lower 7 bits (in case an encryption password were provided directly--if perhaps foolishly). I would think it most sensible that it keeps the lower 7 bits of each byte and shifts them along with computed parity into the 3DES implementation. Of course, it could do something less sensible, instead, and lose entropy.
Jun
5
awarded  c#
May
7
comment Detect if code is running as a service
@JonSeigel, but the whole point is that you can't rely on the user or third-party developer to use such an API without mistake, so when creating a commercial-grade library to be included in other developers' apps a method of determining it from within the library using the framework/OS is the only way to make it bulletproof (at least as much as possible). In other cases, where you can control the external app as well, an API to tell the common library which way it's invoked can be easier to rely on. I really like the reflection answer I found, assuming it works reliably in all cases.
May
7
comment Detect if code is running as a service
BTW, in following some of the associated links, I just noticed an answer on a similar question ( stackoverflow.com/questions/200163/am-i-running-as-a-service ) which demonstrates reflecting the entry assembly and its EntryPoint and checking whether the class is derived from System.ServiceProcess.ServiceBase. That may be a fairly useful approach for an independent library to determine whether it is running within a launched service.
May
7
comment Detect if code is running as a service
Thanks for the caveat, @JonSeigel. What OS was that introduced in? If it existed pre-Vista then it undermines the check (unless user-interactive is what you actually care about). On Vista and later, the check of SessionId is more reliable, anyway. But, this caveat means that the OS version must be checked (if pre-Vista is supported) to determine the reliability of SessionId vs. needing to check UserInteractive for a semi-reliable hint.
Apr
22
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
27
comment Check is time inside a range
Or replace the entire if with simply (now.TimeOfDay >= startTime.TimeOfDay ^^ now.TimeOfDay > endTime.TimeOfDay). It may also be better to pass a TimeSpan for the start and end rather than DateTime so you can specify 0 and 24:00:00.
Mar
27
comment Check is time inside a range
I think your inverted check in the else clause should be using > and < rather than >= and <= ... then you might not need the extra checks of == up front. Or you could write it as (now.TimeOfDay >= startTime.TimeOfDay || now.TimeOfDay <= end.TimeOfDay)--without the ! to invert it--which shows more clearly that it's true on the boundaries as in the then clause.