9,318 reputation
1928
bio website Idonthaveany
location Rainbow, ME
age 36
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Jul 11 at 21:43

Way up high...


Jun
29
comment Removing files in a sub directory based on modification date
or -delete instead of -exec rm -v {} \;
Jun
29
comment Run random command in bash script
For true random, /dev/urandom is cool, but you don't need dd+cksum+cutod is enough, e.g., od -An -tu -N2 /dev/urandom. (the -N2 option tells how many bytes to read, here 2 bytes–you can replace with 1, 3 or 4 with no further adaptations).
Jun
27
revised bash loop to assign variables values without overwriting previously declared variables
added 584 characters in body
Jun
27
revised bash loop to assign variables values without overwriting previously declared variables
added 79 characters in body
Jun
27
answered bash loop to assign variables values without overwriting previously declared variables
Jun
27
revised Replace string in filename in bash
Quotes!
Jun
27
revised Bash -eq evaluates to true?
added 21 characters in body
Jun
27
comment Preserving whitespaces in a string as a command line argument
In Bash there's the %q format modifier of printf that can help with your case: printf -v filepath_escaped '%q' "$filepath"; su - user1 -c "test -r $filepath_escaped".
Jun
27
comment Preserving whitespaces in a string as a command line argument
You have to understand how quotes work. There are no nestings for quotes. I'll take your full command: su - user1 -c 'test -r "'${filepath}'";'. If filepath contains spaces, e.g., filepath='a b', then when you do su - user1 -c 'test -r "'${filepath}'";', bash will expand to the following words: su, -, user1, -c, test -r "a, b";. Not what you want. With IFS=% it seems that it works, but it'll fail if filepath contains wildcards or the symbol % or the symbol " (or other globs).
Jun
27
comment Preserving whitespaces in a string as a command line argument
Stop spreading retarded hacks, please. You're clearly showing that you don't understand the importance of quotes. By default, whitespaces are trimed: WRONG. Without quotes, you're going under word splitting and filename expansions. Cure this with quotes: VAR1="abc def gh ijk"; echo "$VAR1". Now it works. Also, how would you explain what happens in the case of a wildcard: VAR1='*'; echo $VAR1 vs VAR1='*'; echo "$VAR1"? Even with your IFS thing, you'll get the same horrible result: IFS=%; VAR1='*'; echo $VAR1. Just use more quotes. Period.
Jun
27
comment Finding all file types in directory
echo 'gniourf.tar.gz' | awk -F . {'print $2'} gives tar and echo 'one.two.three.pdf' | awk -F . {'print $2'} gives two. Are you sure your approach is the good one?
Jun
26
comment tempfile not being given the right name. $BASHPID is changing?
@Adrian I'm not sure we can call it a bug… yet you can try to file a bug report and see what reply you get.
Jun
26
revised tempfile not being given the right name. $BASHPID is changing?
added 8 characters in body
Jun
26
revised tempfile not being given the right name. $BASHPID is changing?
added 392 characters in body
Jun
26
revised Loop through variable 2 elements at a time in bash
deleted 202 characters in body
Jun
26
revised tempfile not being given the right name. $BASHPID is changing?
added 4 characters in body
Jun
26
answered tempfile not being given the right name. $BASHPID is changing?
Jun
26
revised Piping the output of a program that doesn't write to stdout
added 813 characters in body
Jun
26
revised Piping the output of a program that doesn't write to stdout
added 813 characters in body
Jun
26
answered Piping the output of a program that doesn't write to stdout