14,215 reputation
31836
bio website Idonthaveany
location Rainbow, ME
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 22 mins ago

Way up high...


1d
comment Is there an advantage to using env for setting variable for a subshell?
@5gon12eder Unfortunately your eval line doesn't work in the following cases: if the variable names contain spaces or characters that can't be part of a variable name in Bash; more importantly if the fields contain spaces or other funny symbols. As such, your line is subject to code injection: new_env[@]=( "env_var=hello rm -rf *" ) would be handled in a rather unfunny way with your method.
1d
comment How do I pass variable inside find and bash -c?
{} is not meant to be used that way; your command is subject to code injection (file named "); find / -delete; a=(" would have a rather funny effect. Instead: use {} as so: ... -exec bash -c 'old=$(basename "$0") ...' {} \; By the way, I don't really see the use of env here. Either use $2 as another argument to bash, or use it as an environment variable once for all: ext=$2 find .... Also, with bash, you can really do without basename.
1d
comment Is there an advantage to using env for setting variable for a subshell?
Why is it really convenient to use env here like so? I mean, you can use ext=$2 find ... directly. It might be more efficient too. Or even you can pass this as an extra argument to bash: find ... -exec bash -c '...' "$2" {}.
1d
comment Is there an advantage to using env for setting variable for a subshell?
The only thing I've ever used env for is to set environment variables with funny names to test programs and to see them break miserably; e.g., env $'a\nb=c' program.
1d
comment Is there an advantage to using env for setting variable for a subshell?
Do you have a specific use case of this with find? Besides, this is not portable, as POSIX specifies If a utility_name or argument string contains the two characters "{}", but not just the two characters "{}", it is implementation-defined whether find replaces those two characters or uses the string without change.
2d
comment Why does the pre/absence of xargs affect the output from a subsequent echo command?
xargs echo will execute the external command echo, very likely at /bin/echo, and this is not your builtin echo. Try (from your command line) with your external echo: /bin/echo -e '\x41\x41'POSIX specifies that the echo utility doesn't take any options.
2d
comment Bash: Join elements of an array?
@JamesSneeringer I purposely used this design so as to avoid subshells. In shell scripting, unlike in many other languages, global variables used that way are not necessarily a bad thing; especially if they are here to help avoiding subshells. Moreover, $(...) trims trailing newlines; so if the last field of the array contains trailing newlines, these would be trimmed (see demo where they are not trimmed with my design).
Mar
27
answered check and reuse old numbers from a numbered list
Mar
26
comment Bash: Using Number of Lines in File in Variable
Use ${NUM_LINES} (with the curlies) in your echo statement. Otherwise, Bash thinks you mean the variable named NUM_LINES__features which isn't set and expands to nothing.
Mar
26
comment Bash script processing too slow
You're still reading the second file each time a line of the first file is read. In Bash, a while read loop is notoriously slow. Besides you're not addressing other problems in the OP: why do you set IFS globally like so? OP opens and closes the file mapping.csv for each match; lacks of quotes; overall design problems etc.
Mar
25
answered Deleting lines matching a string in a file
Mar
25
comment Find command in linux bash shell
No… there's nothing conceptually different from your answer (which is the correct answer and that I upvoted). You may include it in yours, or leave it as a comment for future reference.
Mar
25
comment Find command in linux bash shell
It's not that difficult to do it in POSIX shell: something like [ "$#" -eq 0 ] && exit; i=$#; set -- "$@" -false; while [ "$i" -gt 0 ]; do s=$1; shift; set -- "$@" -o -path "$s"; i=$((i-1)); done; find . \( "$@" \) -prune.
Mar
24
revised Bash script to copy a folder's contents and overwrite destination?
Added healthy quotes+consistent use of [ and [[
Mar
24
comment Number of elements returned by find in bash script
@terdon: You overlooked my answer: there's a solution with the -printf switch of find that I specified is not POSIX, and there's a solution with the command printf, which is part of the POSIX utilities. So yes, it's possible to do this POSIXly.
Mar
24
revised Detect the OS from a Bash script
deleted 12 characters in body
Mar
24
comment validate for empty string including a space linux
[[ $Forename =~ ^\ *$ ]] is enough. Or even without regex but globs: [[ $Forename = *([[:space:]]) ]]
Mar
24
comment How to delete the contents of all the files in a directory
You mean: -exec cp /dev/null {} \; and your -name "*.*" is (wrong and) useless.
Mar
24
comment How to delete the contents of all the files in a directory
If you have GNU goodies, the fastest might be this: truncate --size 0 /tmp/REPORTS/*.
Mar
24
revised validate for empty string including a space linux
Code format