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1d
comment Minimum to Maximum Connectivity Network
Can you add a link to it in the question? Answering a programming contest question before the programming contest is over is a shitty thing to do.
2d
comment Minimum to Maximum Connectivity Network
Which programming contest is this from?
Aug
30
comment In Sun's libm, what does *(1+(int*)&x) do (where x is of type double)?
@PascalCuoq: We already need to specify -fno-strict-aliasing when we're writing networking code. I've never seen the results of alias analysis meaningfully improve a program's performance, so it doesn't seem unreasonable to me to use -fno-strict-aliasing everywhere.
Aug
30
comment In Sun's libm, what does *(1+(int*)&x) do (where x is of type double)?
It's called __HI, which is a name reserved by the standard. You already get UB by defining something called __HI regardless of its content.
Aug
30
answered Maximize board score
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
Memoization isn't obscure, but it also doesn't require a total ordering. Convert the double via memcpy or similar to an integral type of equal size, such as int64_t, and use that int64_t as a key. (Or array<char, sizeof(double) if you're one of those people.)
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
@supercat: Some fancy math libraries like CRlibm have trigpi functions. You're in a deep state of sin if you need < on floating-point numbers both to act as < on floating-point numbers should and to act as a total order.
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
@leftaroundabout: I have never had a numerical booboo that a fancy type system would catch. (But I've also never worked on anything related to physics. I do optimisation, and we don't have units.) NaN propagation lets you write clear logic for the common case and provably detect if something went awry. Checking for "impossibly high kinetic energies" might usually work in a physics simulation, but one can likely design an input for which it fails.
Aug
26
comment Can undefined behavior which would follow a getc() alter program behavior if the getc() exits via SIGINT
@supercat: I'd prefer if compiler writers would stop just making shit up on the fly to justify their bugs. GCC has been relatively good about this.
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
@supercat: IEEE 754-2008 (or however you punctuate it) does recommend that implementations provide both a total order and the usual floating-point comparisons. Unfortunately, they aren't in a position to dictate syntax to the C and C++ committees. I believe it also recommends sinpi and cospi and friends for your second complaint. I agree, though; pity it wasn't there at the beginning.
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
@leftaroundabout: Have you ever written numerical code? Fancy type systems will not save you. The way NaNs are handled was carefully designed so that you can still check for errors but you don't have to pollute your code with explicit, rarely-taken conditionals everywhere.
Aug
26
comment Can undefined behavior which would follow a getc() alter program behavior if the getc() exits via SIGINT
@user3629249: There seems to be substantial contention about whether the answer is "Duh, no" or "Yeah, whatever makes the SPEC benchmarks run faster." You can probably get someone who works on Clang to tell you that every program that contains a division by 0 in dead code is actually invalid C.
Aug
26
comment Why does NaN - NaN == 0.0 with the Intel C++ Compiler?
@leftaroundabout: Your position is that, if I want something "safe", I better not use any of the features that help me write code that's both fast and safe because you think they're weird?
Aug
25
comment Correctly divide a double to be able to get back the correct amount
@Kayaman: BigDecimal can't represent rationals exactly. It's still a floating-point format, and the pigeonhole principle still applies---there is still a BigDecimal f such that (1/f)*f != 1. ("If you're dealing with money, you need to work with BigDecimal" is totally false, by the way; plenty of financial applications get by just fine using doubles.)
Aug
25
comment Correctly divide a double to be able to get back the correct amount
@Kayaman: How do you think that will help?
Aug
24
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
21
comment Why do they use >, <, and == in compare(float float1, float float2) in Java?
It's incorrect to implement compare() in the other way you described.
Aug
19
comment Double's multiplication is less precise than float's one
@ThomasMatthews: Do you have a specific passage in that 100-page document you're trying to reference, or are you just trying to be a jerk?
Aug
19
comment Ensure float to be smaller than exact value
@StillLearning: I don't know a better solution for people who want directed rounding. It's unfortunate that compiler vendors don't care about implementing their languages correctly, and it's also unfortunate that there's no real recourse besides whining like me on the Internet if you haven't got several months to learn a compiler's internal workings well enough to contribute. But that seems to be how life currently is.