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comment Efficient Union Find with Existential Quantifier?
Supposing you have exists h (a1=h /\ ... /\ an=h /\ stuff not involving h), you can hoist the stuff not involving h outside the quantifier. Then the inside is just asking for a1=a2 /\ a1=a3 /\ ... /\ a1=an; it doesn't involve h, so the quantifier can be dropped. I don't see the problem here.
Jan
22
comment Why can't I use float value as a template parameter?
This doesn't really give a convincing explanation. The whole point of floating-point is that it does represent values exactly. You're free to treat the numbers you have as approximations to something else, and it's often useful to do so, but the numbers themselves are exact.
Jan
21
comment Hexadecimal floating point literals in c++
Is it actually unportable to use hexfloats? As in, is there a modern compiler that doesn't support them?
Jan
21
comment How inlining could constrain binary compatibility for upgrade releases
This is probably a programmers.SE question, but the answer given is quite good and I don't want to mess with it.
Jan
21
comment Treating a hexadecimal value as single precision or double precision value
@Gautam: If that's all that's going on, do input and output in C99 hexfloat format instead.
Jan
21
comment Treating a hexadecimal value as single precision or double precision value
@Gautam: It's implementation-defined. Nothing wrong with doing it, but it theoretically limits portability to systems few people currently use and systems that don't yet exist. If you're trying to specify floating-point numbers in a more sensible notation, lots of compilers support C99 hexfloats---0x1.0p+2 is 4, and 0x1.5555555555555p+0 is roughly 4/3.
Jan
20
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
@aka.nice: There appears to be a double-rounding anomaly in your philosophy. I'm measuring the distance from the exact result, not the correctly-rounded result, to the result one gets from a certain computation.
Jan
20
awarded  Pundit
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
@aka.nice: The nearest float to the correct answer is indeed 50.5, but the decreasing sum is off by 0.9990234375 ulp while the increasing sum is off by 1.0009765625 ulp. (In the first version of this comment, I thought you were talking about adding the closest floats to 0.0001 through 1 together, which is actually another weird example where summing in reverse wins.)
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
@DavidWallace: OK, then 0.1 is a multiple of a power of two. It is exactly the number with the following finite binary expansion: 0x1.999999999999ap-4. And 0.1f has the binary expansion 0x1.99999ap-4. My point stands here, if you compute 1.0f + 0.99f + ... + 0.01f, the final result is less wrong than if you compute 0.01f + 0.02f + ... + 1.0f.
Jan
19
revised java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
Clarify that I don't want you to declare other things as `double` and that I really do want to add the `float`s.
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
Since when has 0.1 been representable as a float? Read the code. (I suspect I'm making this point too subtly. I'll edit the question to make it more obvious what's going on.)
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
@DavidWallace: Yes it does. See my comment under your comment under my answer.
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
@DavidWallace: Read the code. All of the summands are multiples of a power of two larger than 2^(-40). So yes, you can get the exact answer by declaring f and g as double. The exact sum of those 100 floats is the number I gave, which is smaller than 0x1.94p5.
Jan
19
comment What is the precision of std::erf?
glibc's erf and erfc actually came from fdlibm, so fdlibm's erf and erfc are faithfully-rounded as well.
Jan
19
comment What is the precision of std::erf?
You cannot measure the precision of a function like this in "digits" unless it's a very poor approximation. Being correct to 17 digits yet returning a double is impossible to achieve even for the function x/3; consider the input 29. There is no "standard implementation" in the sense of "standard C++," but the one in glibc is faithfully-rounded and I'd expect Apple did just as well. I have not examined fdlibm's erf/erfc, if it even has them.
Jan
19
comment What is the precision of std::erf?
There is no "special underflow FP value." On a good implementation, you will get 0 and an underflow flag if erf or erfc computes a value closer to zero than the smallest subnormal floating-point number.
Jan
19
comment What is the precision of std::erf?
It's not specified. I believe a conforming C++ implementation is permitted to say 42.0 when asked for the sine of one radian. However, in practice, you can assume that double-precision erf is faithfully rounded---you will get one of the two floating-point numbers closest to the erf of the number you fed it.
Jan
19
comment java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )
Unfortunately, in this case it works out the opposite way.
Jan
19
answered java floating point accuracy ( 0.1+0.2+…+1.00 ..or.. 1.00+0.99+0.98+…+0.1 )