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comment Count the number of digits of a floating-point number
@Malina: Your question is clear. It just doesn't make any sense. You may as well ask how many digits there are in a hamburger or why so many cattle had to be slaughtered to make your double.
Jul
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
1
comment Loops not recognizing variables?
This is why self-contained examples are a good thing...
Jul
1
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@temple: If a and b are finite, c can be -oo, finite, or oo. If c is -oo, then a - c == oo and b - c = oo. If c is oo, then a - c = -oo and b - c = -oo. If c is finite, then, before rounding, a-c >= b-c. Rounding preserves >=.
Jun
30
comment Ways around using a double as a key in a std set/map
@zhaomin: Don't use floating-point numbers as keys in a dictionary if you're fuzzy on what they are. Also, don't use them as keys in a dictionary if you want unequal numbers to compare equal. There is nothing wrong with using doubles as keys. ("Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?")
Jun
30
comment Ways around using a double as a key in a std set/map
@ChristianHackl: Finitely many, and that's a stupid analogy to begin with. How many ints are there larger than 42 according to the C++ standard?
Jun
29
comment Ways around using a double as a key in a std set/map
@ChristianHackl: Floating-point numbers are discrete data.
Jun
29
comment Ways around using a double as a key in a std set/map
Why do you consider floating-point precision a problem when using doubles as a key in a tree or hash table structure? It works as long as you don't use NaNs as keys, and it even works exactly as you'd expect.
Jun
29
answered Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
Jun
27
comment Are there denormalized floats that evaluate to the same value apart from +0/-0?
Having a value hash to different things at different times might break invariants of the hash table.
Jun
27
comment ActionScript - Number.toExponential rounding
OK. That doesn't come across to me in either question. You should state your requirements clearly and succinctly at the top of the question. If you want to discuss why toString and toExponential don't fit them afterward, that's fine. Deleting either question or both is not necessary.
Jun
27
comment ActionScript - Number.toExponential rounding
Both questions seem to be asking for confirmation that toExponential is garbage. I don't see any possible answer other than "yes, toExponential is garbage and your observations are accurate" or "no, it's not and here's why" to either one. I guess the other one is asking why toExponential returns values that are totally wrong and this one is asking why you get funky rounding, but they seem fundamentally the same to me.
Jun
26
comment ActionScript - Number.toExponential rounding
How does this question differ from stackoverflow.com/q/31071803/1834147?
Jun
23
comment How to get mantissa/exponent bits in mpf_t type defined in GNU MP?
It's documented pretty well in gmp.h, I think. _mp_size tells you how many limbs there are in the mantissa, _mp_d tells you where the limbs are, and _mp_exp tells you the exponent.
Jun
23
comment Java and floating point arithmetic
What result did you desire?
Jun
19
comment Rules of thumb for using IEEE 754 floating pointer numbers?
@supercat: You compute S = 16777216.0f there where you wanted S = 16777217.0. (Or you get S = 16777218.0f if you add it as a+(b+c); same difference.) The subtractions S-A and S-B result in the totally wrong value 1.0f. However, this error was not introduced by the subtraction; it was already there when you computed S.
Jun
19
comment Rules of thumb for using IEEE 754 floating pointer numbers?
Yes, I agree, and that's often how you think about things in practice. But the case where both arguments to the subtraction are exact floating-point numbers arises fairly often, either directly or because of a "change of philosophy" in an algorithm.
Jun
19
comment Rules of thumb for using IEEE 754 floating pointer numbers?
That article is by Goldberg. What's fun about your first guideline is that the difference of two floating-point numbers of roughly equal magnitude incurs no roundoff at all (Sterbenz's theorem); if the values themselves are the result of arithmetic that rounded, it simply makes plain the problem that occurred earlier.
Jun
18
comment Minimum and maximum of signed zero
@MikeMB: Kahan has an interesting paper/rant called "Branch Cuts for Complex Elementary Functions, or Much Ado About Nothing's Sign Bit." One point it makes is that, since the imaginary part of a real written as a complex number can have either sign bit, there need not be any complex number for which sqrt isn't defined; sqrt(-1.0 + 0.0i) can be +i and sqrt(-1.0 - 0.0i) can be -i. This is actually how C99's csqrt works. Another point the paper makes is that this "usually makes programs work better."