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16h
comment Is there any fast ray→surface intersection algorithm?
You could tile your surface with spline patches or something. Finding the intersection of a ray with a spline patch takes constant time, but it is no cakewalk.
1d
comment Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
You want the maximum n such that an n-digit decimal number can be roundtripped through a binary floating-point number without changing its value, right? I have no idea what "significant digits" have to do with anything.
1d
comment Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
OK. The first definition doesn't make sense for binary floating-point. You should put the second definition into the question so that readers can know exactly what you're talking about. That aligns with the meaning of FLT_DIG and friends as I know it, but I'll leave it to someone else to pull the relevant quotation out of the standard.
1d
revised Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
Add floating-point tag, remove macros tag.
1d
revised Is floating point precision mutable or invariant?
Add floating-point tag, remove computer-science tag.
1d
comment Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
OK. What is "the decimal precision"? Any discussion needs to start with a definition of the term, and you haven't yet given one that makes sense outside the context of a decimal floating-point system.
1d
comment Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
I also can't make any sense of the question in your first link. What statement do you want to make that involves FLT_DIG? Also, you know that these are typically radix-2, not radix-10 formats, right?
1d
comment Do floats, doubles, and long doubles have a guaranteed minimum precision?
What does "decimal precision" mean?
1d
comment C dynamically printf double, no loss of precision and no trailing zeroes
@Ruslan: Looks right. Thanks!
1d
reviewed Approve C dynamically printf double, no loss of precision and no trailing zeroes
1d
comment Optimize for fast multiplication but slow addition: FMA and doubledouble
@Zboson: Min and max by magnitude lets you use "Fast2Sum"; if x is larger in magnitude than y, you can do hi = x+y; lo = (x-hi)+y; the difference and the sum in the computation of lo are exact. "The handbook of floating-point arithmetic" has all these tricks and many more. I found Ogita, Rump, and Oishi's "Accurate sum and dot product" pretty educational, but it's by no means the original reference for Fast2Sum.
1d
comment C dynamically printf double, no loss of precision and no trailing zeroes
@Ruslan: Bah! It's from PLDI '96 if that helps you at all. Trying to find another link to a pdf but I'm coming up empty. Feel free to edit if you find an online copy.
1d
comment Optimize for fast multiplication but slow addition: FMA and doubledouble
If you're just after a bit more accuracy than double, you could compute x2hi + x2lo + y2hi + y2lo + cx by doing a Knuth 2-sum of x2hi and y2hi (6 flops), another Knuth 2-sum with cx (another 6 flops), then just sum the four remainder terms. You could compute 2*x*y+cy using the FMA-based double*double -> double double product, doing a Knuth 2-sum with cy, and adding together the remainder terms. (I haven't tested this or done a serious analysis, so this suggestion may be garbage.)
1d
reviewed Approve addition of single precision negative floats in c
May
29
comment `std::sin` is wrong in the last bit
@StephenCanon: Sure. "Nothing to say" isn't an accurate portrayal of the situation.
May
29
revised `std::sin` is wrong in the last bit
Whoops; that's a 6, not a 0.
May
29
comment `std::sin` is wrong in the last bit
@horchler: IEEE 754-2008 recommends correct rounding of sin.
May
29
comment `std::sin` is wrong in the last bit
@Trollkemada: No, the last few digits of the Matlab result are bogus. No double has a decimal expansion that starts like that.
May
29
answered `std::sin` is wrong in the last bit
May
29
comment Minimum k elements of an mxn matrix, with the restriction that none of the elements can be in the same row/column
This is min-weight bipartite matching. No, greedy doesn't work.