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comment How to choose epsilon value for floating point?
@DmitriNesteruk: If you don't have 1.0 + 2.0 == 3.0, then you have very broken floating-point arithmetic.
Feb
3
comment How to choose epsilon value for floating point?
Also note that C#'s Double.Epsilon is not machine epsilon (2^(-53)), but rather the smallest normal double (2^(-1023) or so). So your multiplication underflows.
Feb
3
comment Efficient faithfully-rounded implementation of error function erff()
(Deleted a comment that came from my failure to recognise the evaluation of a cubic via Estrin's scheme.)
Feb
3
comment How to choose epsilon value for floating point?
The error in 1.0 + 2.0 - 3.0 is zero.
Feb
3
comment Efficient faithfully-rounded implementation of error function erff()
Going up in degree by one can get you a fast-path polynomial that's faithfully-rounded on [0,1]. Its coefficients are 0x1.900c1cp-14, -0x1.c16a0ep-11, 0x1.58a476p-8, -0x1.b8a2ep-6, 0x1.ce3782p-4, -0x1.81276ep-2, 0x1.06eba6p-3. Not certain how much that helps...
Feb
2
comment Calculating floating point error bound
Gotcha. Double.Epsilon on .NET is, I recall, the smallest normal double rather than machine epsilon. I haven't got a good workaround for you besides ensuring that you have a less badly-scaled problem than that.
Feb
1
comment Rounding error using the floor function in C++
floor is working correctly here. You are simply expecting an incorrect result.
Jan
31
comment Calculating floating point error bound
@NMO: On what platform and with what specific numbers?
Jan
31
comment Why is the conversion in non-strictfp mode considered as the one losing information?
What do you mean by "more accurate"? If you mean that the range of representable values is larger, that may or may not be true, and if it is true, it may or may not be true in a consistent fashion. This doesn't necessarily have any bearing on whether code written to use such types will continue working as intended without strictfp. Put another way, having floats that are "more accurate" can actually cause the end result of a computation to be more bogus. And not because the computation is poorly-engineered.
Jan
30
answered Naive Bayes Classification Floating Point Underflow
Jan
26
comment Why can't I use float value as a template parameter?
@iheanyi: Does the standard say what 12345 * 12345 is? (It does allow int template parameters even though it doesn't specify the width of a signed int or whether that expression is UB.)
Jan
24
comment Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
I don't know what -ffast-math does. I just assume it's equivalent to -fbreak-my-carefully-written-code -fbreak-fast-hacky-things, though I have no direct experience to back that up.
Jan
24
comment Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
It might be educational for you to look at the output of printf("%a %a %a\n", (float &)foo-1, (float &)foo+256, (float &)foo+256-257); It's substantially easier to see this sort of thing when using hexadecimal floating-point notation.
Jan
24
comment Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
Aha. I transcribed it incorrectly; I had an off-by-one. Does it work now? Adding 256 and subtracting 257 effectively gives a coarser rounding of foo.
Jan
24
revised Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
Off-by-one.
Jan
24
comment Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
@Clairvoire: x / 255.0f is very different from x * (1.0f / 255.0f).
Jan
24
comment Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
@dshin: I want to round the value. tofloat(255) winds up being substantially wrong---off by something like 1.5e-5---if you don't.
Jan
24
answered Most efficient way to convert uint8 to float of range 0-1
Jan
24
comment Why can't you switch on floats in Java?
Not sure I see why this is a duplicate of the question it's marked a duplicate of. The linked question concerns number representation. Since it's possible to specify a float exactly in your source code, why shouldn't you be able to switch on float values? (My next question: why would you ever want to?)
Jan
24
comment Please explain Theorem 4 in What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic
@sunqingyao: I see three requirements. First, xbar is a floating point number. Second, xbar is close to x. Third, 1+xbar is also a floating-point number---that is, no roundoff occurs when computing fp(1+xbar).