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revised The requested operation cannot be performed on a file with a user-mapped section open
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comment Returning IEnumerable<T> vs IQueryable<T>
@AlexanderPritchard none of them are objects in memory since they're not real types per se, they're markers of a type - if you want to go that deep. But it makes sense (and that's why even MSDN put it this way) to think of IEnumerables as in-memory collections whereas IQueryables as expression trees. The point is that the IQueryable interface inherits the IEnumerable interface so that if it represents a query, the results of that query can be enumerated. Enumeration causes the expression tree associated with an IQueryable object to be executed.
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revised Returning IEnumerable<T> vs IQueryable<T>
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Feb
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comment Returning IEnumerable<T> vs IQueryable<T>
so, in fact, you can't really call any IEnumerable member without having the object in the memory. It will get in there if you do, anyways, if it's not empty. IQueryables are just queries, not the data. But I really see your point. I'm gonna add a comment on this.
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comment How do I select a random value from an enumeration?
hah.."I use Java 'cause I don't see sharp" :) It is a c# topic, man ;)
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revised Returning IEnumerable<T> vs IQueryable<T>
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revised Returning IEnumerable<T> vs IQueryable<T>
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answered Should I stick onto Entity Framework?
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comment AnkhSVN - Renaming (changing its case) a file inside Visual Studio
Simply saying, the only thing you have to do is to commit the parent folder from the Windows Explorer. Everything else, like renaming and copying can be done from the VS IDE.