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Feb
17
comment define associate array without value
@ATOzTOA yes, I simply create a duplicate of the index array into an associative array and use the associative array. I still enter the values as normal. It wastes space but at least is fast to manually enter in the elements and fast to search.
Feb
17
answered define associate array without value
Feb
17
comment define associate array without value
because I'd have to add :1 to about 1000 + elements and to every element I manually added to the array.
Feb
17
comment define associate array without value
Yes, I have speed issues, I've fixed them by converting my arrays to associative arrays and it's about 1000 times faster now. (instant)
Feb
17
comment define associate array without value
I said they are hard coded, manually, and already exist, I'd have to manually add all values by hand(I could use a search and replace but still slow). I'd have to add the values by hand to all the keys I've added. I am not using the values. Just the keys for O(1) lookup.
Feb
17
asked define associate array without value
Jan
21
comment lua embeded in html with apache
Nope, this doesn't work. I already had lua files working fine. That or it's not <?lua.
Jan
21
asked lua embeded in html with apache
Jan
21
comment low level ethernet driver to read bits off phy layer
@ppeterka It's not low bandwidth and it's not short distances. It's basically digital communications using a different protocol than standard ethernet.
Jan
21
asked low level ethernet driver to read bits off phy layer
Dec
30
comment Word wrap in Eclipse Java?
I've tried this but it doesn't work ;/ Using latest eclipse, texeclipse, and ahti. I did eclipse -clean. When using "word wrap" from the properties it seems to work but then a second later returns to the way it was. I can use the "correct line wrap" to good effect but it only seems to work per paragraph, and I guess is hard wrapping.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
@IdanArye yeah, it might work for my application as I won't need any logic for value type aliasing. Well, at least since the types are wrapped I can move any init code into the constructor of the main class, which if I'm careful to use the ref's should make everything work. Thanks, I'll play around with the idea and see if it will work better than using classes or not.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
As was pointed out by a few, D stores a pointer to class info or a vtable which is required for inheritance when you override methods and some way to associate type information with an *object*(which is just data). When I wrote the question I forgot that D added that stuff to support it's type system. I guess when I saw 8 bytes on a 32bit app I was shocked for no apparent reason except that I was using classes to wrap value types and it would severely bloat my program.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
Matt, unfortunately it's not like deadalnix's. You are addressing general things not applicable to the problem and many things are wrong. Class or struct objects do not store "code" inside them but only data(the fields). If you have a class or struct without any fields but a ton of methods then it will not take up any space(well, except 8 bytes in D, which is what the question pertained to). Why? Because a method is common to all objects(the code won't change) and it is stored outside the object itself. While it is true it will add to the size of the app it won't add to the size of object.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
using a struct/class as a wrapper and alias [value] this is perfect for that. Unfortunately classes have all that overhead for small types and structs make it difficult to pass by reference(which I need to do to make things easier to sync and store). Passing structs by ref is probably the way to go but one slip and forgetting to add a ref modifier and things are all downhill.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
I'm simply talking about the syntax. Structs do not have a parameterless constructor to initialize fields with. This means all fields will be 0 when a struct type is instantiated. Classes have this() { } to set the fields to whatever they want. For example, what if one field is the divisor? 0 is a very bad value to have it initialized to. In any case, it seems I'll end up having to either use structs or try and find a way to use a larger class containing all the values to do what I want. Basically I would like to override the opAssign on fields to notify listeners.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
@IdanArye Sometimes you want to be able to be able to initialize the values properly. The pass by reference is costly in that, AFAIK, structs are generated on the stack and can keep other data around. While it's possible to create a struct on the heap it it makes things much more difficult in the long road(it is sort of a solution but I hope you don't forget to pass it by ref!). You might be right on the last point as I'm not sure where the break even point is.
Dec
6
comment Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
Structs are value types and could be costly to pass around vs pointers for classes. They also do not allow custom default constructors. I understand there are advantages in many cases but not all cases. If I'm just wrapping a value with some methods(without inheritance/virtual functions) then all the class types and vtable space is just wasted. I do realize it would be very risky as is so maybe another type is needed?
Dec
5
accepted Why are empty classes 8 bytes and larger classes always > 8 bytes?
Dec
5
awarded  Supporter