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Apr
18
comment How to reduce the memory usage of a C# console application project?
You might as well replace int.TryParse(mas[i].ToString(), out n) with '0' <= text[i] && text[i] <= '9' and n = text[i] - '0'. And skip mas altogether, index text instead.
Apr
14
comment What is going on in computer memory here?
@awallace04 The existing answers have explained perfectly why it outputs what it does. If they haven't covered you, please phrase your question with more details and we can retry.
Apr
13
comment C++ String Unable to Read Memory
Do you initialize the _folder member to something, before appending to it?
Apr
13
comment What is going on in computer memory here?
What did you expect to see? You're reading way past the bounds of an array. The program could be showing you anything. Is it one of those professors who try to show you "how powerful C++ is" by using things that are explicitly illegal but look cool?
Apr
13
comment How to prevent a struct's default contructor to be called?
@ptr0x Definitely. default(T) is null for all classes and no constructor is necessary. But if you want to maintain blittable types, you can still go for the hidden validity flag.
Apr
13
comment How to prevent a struct's default contructor to be called?
@ptr0x In C#, if a struct exists, then zero-initialization can be performed by anyone. Even if you hid the default constructor, someone could still do new S[1] and get one zero-initialized instance of your struct. I can't think of any easy way out of this. Maybe if your public struct is effectively just a handle to the real struct, and the real struct is kept internal? I'm just speculating.
Apr
13
comment How to prevent a struct's default contructor to be called?
Default struct constructors in C# aren't constructors at the CLR level. They are strictly zero initialization constructs made to look (syntactically) like constructors. What kind of unwanted behavior do they cause? Can you tell us more about your use case?
Apr
13
comment What's wrong with new String?
There's definitely a default String constructor, and it creates an empty String.
Apr
11
comment How to implement C++ style function pointers in C#?, Without using delegates
What does the JIT have to do with the question?
Apr
9
comment C malloc and free
Never mind, disregard my previous comments, I thought you were asking something else.
Apr
6
comment Why can a void method in C++ return a void value, but in other languages it cannot?
@Sjoerd Yes, it would definitely be possible to implement templates in any language, as templates don't require any runtime support. (Although it would be good to have some runtime support, to be able to instantiate templates across libraries.) But the way templates work and the semantics they carry don't seem to be well-liked by the designers of Java (or C#, or most languages that I know that have support for generic programming), because they affect the language in subtle ways, outside of what concerns the templates themselves (e.g. this case with void).
Apr
6
comment Why can a void method in C++ return a void value, but in other languages it cannot?
@AndyTurner Yes, somebody could answer, but you have used your powers to close this question as a duplicate of another question (when it isn't). This question specifically asks why C++ can do it while others can't -- there is an answer to this. The linked question and its answers aren't quite about that.
Mar
27
comment Why does an unassigned int have a value?
@hvd True, it's not applicable to the question at hand. I was just mentioning it to make my previous comment a bit more accurate.
Mar
27
comment Why does an unassigned int have a value?
@juanchopanza For unsigned narrow character types specifically, the spec makes an exception (at 8.5p12) that allows the indeterminate value to be passed around in some cases (though it can still invoke UB in others). It even has a code example highlighting this.
Mar
27
comment Why does an unassigned int have a value?
Though it's also worth noting that if the type is unsigned char specifically, it's still indeterminate but it's not necessarily UB to read it.
Mar
27
comment Why does an unassigned int have a value?
More or less correct, but the value of an uninitialized local isn't the residual bits of that memory location - the value is indeterminate. The fact that it's indeterminate is what invokes undefined behavior, as you correctly state at the end. A local variable that's not initialized might as well not exist, as far as the compiler is concerned.
Mar
27
comment Why does an unassigned int have a value?
While there's UB in the snippet, the OP asked why the pointer has a value, not why the pointed object has a value.
Mar
27
comment Steam SDK game errors when executed through steam
Is it possible that your game makes an assumption about its working directory and that assumption doesn't hold when you launch it another way? And either way, doesn't your game's executable do any kind of logging that would allow you to track down where it crashes?
Mar
26
comment I need help understanding LINQ. Where is my understanding going wrong?
Expression trees don't come into play in your query, because your source is a regular in-memory list. Expression trees are useful when your source is something like a SQL database and LINQ needs to translate your query to SQL.
Mar
26
comment How can I write an optimal Swap (T a, T b) algorithm in C#?
@txtechhelp It's worth noting that the naive swap uses a temporary variable. That variable lives on the stack, because it's local and not captured in a lambda (or anything similar to that). So there won't be anything new for the GC to collect.