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Sep
1
comment Optimal Base-10 only itoa() function?
It has probably been lost in all the muddle, but this code is faster than anything in Ben Voigt's challenge and takes up a lot fewer resources to boot.
Jun
5
comment How to convert std::string to lower case?
This is a lookup table. Did you not read the code?
Apr
15
awarded  Caucus
Mar
22
comment DB with best inserts/sec performance?
A DB is the correct solution if you need data coherency, keyed access, fail-over, ad-hoc query support, etc. Your problem has none of these requirements. Therefore a DB is a poor choice. There are Open Source solutions for logging that are free or low cost, but at your performance level writing the data to a flat-file, probably in a comma-delimited format, is the best option. JSON, or any key-value pair format will about double the storage requirement, and be massively redundant as the keys will be repeated millions of times.
Mar
21
comment DB with best inserts/sec performance?
Speaking of Zipping the archive file, for max performance make the records a uniform size. To find the 10,000,000th record, if you know the record size, you just seek to the file position calculated as (record size * record number) and be done with it. Otherwise you're going to have to scan through every record in the file to get there, or do a lot of work to keep track of where records start while writing the archive file and index file simultaneously. Add a preamble to each record comprising an array of varchar lengths if needed. 7-Zip will reclaim unused white space for you.
Mar
20
revised DB with best inserts/sec performance?
Helped make this question more readable in English for a non-native speaker. A good question that was hard to read and understand.
Mar
20
comment DB with best inserts/sec performance?
Once you're writing onto the pair of T0 files, and your qsort() of the T-1 index is complete, you can 7-Zip the pair of T-1 files to save space. This problem is almost ENTIRELY dependent on I/O bandwidth.
Mar
20
comment DB with best inserts/sec performance?
+1 on using a flat file, which at the end of the day is just a file lacking an index or meta-data visa-vie a DB. You MUST be able to read the archive or fail the legal requirement. I'd RX writing [primary key][rec_num] to a memory-mapped file you can qsort() for an index. The idea is to have an archival file and it's index written to for a specific time period, Eg: 24hrs, and then open a new pair of files for the next period. Once T0 is being written to, qsort() the index for T-1. Performance with RAID of 4xSSDs ~ 2GBs divided by record size. Avg of 256 chars allows 8,388,608 inserts/sec.
Mar
20
suggested approved edit on DB with best inserts/sec performance?
Feb
25
comment Red-Black Trees
I just use the Map from C/C++ STL, but I believe this is the Java equivalent of that. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/TreeMap.html. If you Google around you might be able to find the source code for this Java class - or the online source for Mark Allen Weiss' book. Sorry to punt your request, but it's been over 20 years since I wrote a self-balancing tree and I'm afraid you've caught me flat-footed and busy. Hope this helps a little.
Feb
25
comment How to fix remove in RedBlackTree implementation?
Does this help? I assume it's the equivalent of the STL's ordered Map. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/TreeMap.html
Feb
20
comment Red-Black Trees
Unbalanced trees being fed randomly distributed data are more likely to encounter frequently occurring data before rarely occurring data, thus the more frequently occurring data ends up closer to the root node than less frequently occurring data. This is a subtle point to be sure, but it can be a very important point where resources are limited, or performance is critical.
Feb
20
comment Red-Black Trees
It's worth noting that sometimes a RB Tree, or any self-balancing tree, can produce inferior performance to an unbalanced tree. This seeming contradiction can happen if an unbalanced tree is arranged so that the most frequently accessed nodes are closer to the root than a RB tree would have them. With a randomly distributed data source this happens more than you'd imagine. The important point being RB does not distribute according to access count. It distributes to provide the fastest access to any given key - regardless of how often any given key is retrieved.
Feb
19
revised Red-Black Trees
Addeds some specifics RE: realloc()
Feb
19
suggested approved edit on Red-Black Trees
Feb
13
comment Turn a large chunk of memory backwards, fast
Agree with all said Dietrich, but too close to call, so have to benchmark. I recently wrote something here at SO for Circular Identities, and found an inner-loop conditional branch was cheaper than int mult by zero. Surprising. On the other hand, my int32 to string code, also here at SO, easily beat, by almost 3X, Voight's coding contest results using lookup tables. My general RX is to favor the most register-intensive, simple, brute force method possible, as it may well be the fastest, and then tweak from there if you still need more. BTW, thanks for your contributions here.
Feb
12
comment Turn a large chunk of memory backwards, fast
On my commodity Hazwell box, NOT the intended target to be sure, but what I have, this is about 3X as fast as my very literal interpretation of a solution I provided below. A conditional lookup table would probably be the fastest solution, especially if the bytes were swapped only if they were not identical so that actually doing the swap would be entirely redundant.
Feb
12
comment How do you set, clear and toggle a single bit in C/C++?
@MattMcNabb, you are correct. In C++ the size of the int type necessary to implement a boolean is not specified by the standard. I realized this answer was in error some time ago, but decided to leave it here as people are apparently finding it useful. For those wanting to use bits galinette's comment is most helpful as is my bit library here ... stackoverflow.com/a/16534995/1899861
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
31
comment Design code to fit in CPU Cache?
@GeorgeV.Reilly, thanks for sharing, and stating the source. Impressive. Currently data availability is almost always the problem. Cliff Click's presentation on "Running Java on 1000 Cores" is a great presentation detailing why. In summary, it now takes 300-500 clocks for a cache miss, and given that data goes stale all the time, and instructions never, those are almost always data cache misses. What did your benchmarking reveal? I unrolled some mainframe to PC data conversion routines in 1995 and it helped, but the data was thru-&-thru, so data-caching helped not at all.