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location Sacramento, CA
age 44
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
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C, C++, SQL, STL guy from the way-back machine. If it ever hoped to manage data, I've probably used it, and optimized it.

Used every kind of dbms drempt up over the last 25 years, and wrote a couple of my own. A temporal database, and an In-Memory database.

Have used Hierarchical, Network/BOM, Relational, Object, Object-Relational and even Informix back when it was just an ISAM. Currently having a ball building complex, real-time watch-dog apps using C++ and the STL for a telco.


21h
comment Strategy for recovering from NULL == malloc() due to memory exhaustion
Any idea what happens with an SSD drive? IIRC, Windows has an API call to determine how much physical memory remains, which could be used to stop thrashing. Windows also support multiple heaps, a great feature which no one seems to know about. This would allow tenacious_malloc() to work from its own heap. The malloc()s in tenacious_malloc() should probably be calloc()s though, as Drepper has pointed out, calloc() forces memory to be committed, not just mapped.
21h
comment Strategy for recovering from NULL == malloc() due to memory exhaustion
@R, I don't think this is an argument against the tenacious_malloc() approach. It argues instead that a large block and small block path may be needed, one which makes best use of the environment's heap manager. If, for example, a heap manager gets space for small allocations from it's big-brother big-chunk manager, then a list of small chunks can be used for emergencies, and the request size determines which path through the tenacious_malloc() code is used.
1d
comment Concatenating two arrays of strings?
Your output specification clearly indicates you are NOT trying to merge these two arrays of strings. You are trying to concatenate them.
Jul
21
comment merging two strings together in C, switching off characters
As indicated in my answer below, using & instead of && in the while() test results in 20-45% better performance.
Jul
19
comment merging two strings together in C, switching off characters
The two strings contain all the storage, plus 1 byte when considering their two terminators, to hold the resulting merged string. Does anyone know how to do this merge in place?
Jul
19
comment merging two strings together in C, switching off characters
All those subscripts make for noisy code. The proper replacement for new is calloc(), not malloc(), as calloc() initializes its memory.
Jul
19
comment merging two strings together in C, switching off characters
Stylistically, output should be the left-most argument, and the function should return it, just like strcat(). This is done universally in the C std lib so functions returns can stand in for args when calling functions. For example, printf("%s", strMerge(output, str1, str2)); Also, get in the habit of using calloc() instead of malloc(). Like new, calloc() initializes memory, making it unnecessary to add the nul-terminator, and making debugging a lot easier.
Jul
14
comment How to explain the parameters of getline() in C
+1. I'm a big fan of pre-allocating an arbitrarily large amount of storage, as modern computing platforms typically have massive amounts of RAM available, and techniques like this offer big gains in preventing endless hits to the heap manager, memory which would otherwise be largely wasted trying to cache disk or some other marginally productive use. With careful planning memory can be allocated high enough up in the call-tree to remove almost ALL calls to the heap manager. Putting the returned pointers on structs and passing the struct's pointer down the tree is optimal.
Jul
14
comment When must I use malloc to allocate memory?
+1 & +1. One can mitigate the exo-function scope requirement by hoisting malloc() up to the calling function, and not forcing malloc() to be called millions of times instead of once, AND this is often a big performance improvement as well. This can be done, and normally should be done, even if the size is unknown to the caller, where the function then calls realloc() if memory is insufficient. I say this because the caller needs the pointer to free() memory once the loop is done calling your function. ALWAYS malloc()/calloc() and free() in the same scope. ALWAYS!
Jul
11
comment Remove secure warnings (_CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS) from projects by default in Visual Studio
"Perfect" is the enemy of "Good"?
Jul
10
comment How do you set, clear and toggle a single bit in C/C++?
Sad, but true, booleans are still not implemented as bits, so while very useful, this is not a valid example of how to manipulate bits. I'll leave my answer here as some have found it useful, but even with new Intel processors directly supporting new bit instructions and vectors, booleans are still implemented as 8 bit ints.
Jul
1
comment Alternative to itoa() for converting integer to string C++?
I had the same requirement for a function in C. I'm sure you can figure out how to wrap in in C++. It is thread-safe and handles all positive, negative 32 bit integer numbers, and zero. The performance is EXCELLENT, and the algorithm is lean, so it doesn't soak up a lot of cache. Ben Voigt has a faster approach, but it's not a lightweight algorithm, so unless you are doing billions of these things, it maybe overkill.
May
9
comment Placement of iterator declarations in C11 (coding style)
Works all day long, every day in GCC and MSVC. There is a caveat to beware of though. The scope of i is inside the for{} loop only. As always, where to use which form requires some judgement.
May
8
comment Reading from file vs generating data (speedwise)
It will be much faster to generate it than read it from a file, even with a SSD drive. If there is any way to determine the size of the array up front, even if you have to resize it a few times, the array is preferable to a linked list. An array is a linked list where all the links are positioned right next to each other, in order, and then all the links are discarded. Your Q reminds me of Mark Twain's apology. "Sorry for the long letter. I didn't have time to write a short one." You obviously haven't spent enough time analyzing the problem, so this is going to waste everyone's time.
May
8
comment Why use glib functions?
The short answer is "IT'S NOT". The supposed advantages are trivial, and easy to implement if you think they have value for your usage. For this trivial "improvement" you pay a horrible price in being forced into using Gnome's version of the C language, which is a God-awful mess that doesn't play well with Standard C.
May
6
comment Developing with C# on OSX and Mono
On the other hand, Dell is selling a pretty decent Inspiron with a dual core 64-bit Celeron processor with graphic coprocessor and TrueLife display for $249, so maybe in addition to the RX cross-platform software tools, a little hardware would be helpful too.
May
6
comment Hashset vs Treeset
I was once advised to use a hashtable to hash a tuple of 28 variables - about 20 of which were double floats. Even with 64-bit ints, that's probably impracticable or outright impossible. Using tuples in the C++ STL you can do that with Maps (R-B trees) all day long with zero issues.
May
5
comment Hashset vs Treeset
I tend to think of hashes as lossy compression, because that's what they do - range reduction with collisions. Since open hashing turns into a collisions catastrophe when the load factor goes over 0.50, you have to add the cost of a rehash to the primary hash's cost in CPU cycles. If you know enough about your data to avoid hot spots, can live with non-uniform retrieval times, and a lot of wasted table space, hashes are generally faster for small keys. Best close to the bare metal, and poorer close to the user. They tend to quietly become maintenance problems as data slowly changes.
May
5
comment Hashset vs Treeset
Complexity does NOT specify the relative performance of two different data structures. It specifies how a given data structure's performance changes as a function of n. Obvious, right there in the definition, but very often gotten wrong. The hash function for a large, variable length string is so CPU intensive that you can do a LOT of simple compares in the same amount of time. Kudos to the OP for pointing out that you MUST know the size of the final hashtable up front. Trees, by contrast, are entirely self-maintaining. They grow and shrink on demand, auto-magically.
May
5
comment Why Java Collection Framework doesn't contain Tree and Graph
A big user and fan of the Map and MultiMap in C++ STL, I'm quite surprised it's absent from vanilla Java. Wow.