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bio website twitter.com/#!/StasArtemkin
location Russia
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visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen 17 hours ago

Thinking...


Aug
9
comment const ref and rvalue in D
I tested this on 2.053 on my home mac and it failed. I've just updated to 2.054 and it seems working. Thanks. Anyway, this bug is pretty fresh.
Aug
9
comment const ref and rvalue in D
I've overloaded opEquals(), but the compiler tells me that a function argument matches both opEquals(), so it can't be compiled. See ideone.com/4fyvG . It seems the problem is that CustomReal(123.123456) temporary object is not treated as rvalue. I do not understand why.
Aug
8
comment const ref and rvalue in D
Compiler tells me that opEquals() should use ref const.
Aug
8
asked const ref and rvalue in D
Aug
7
accepted Unary negation operator overloading in D
Aug
7
comment Unary negation operator overloading in D
Thanks. It seems you are right. This is an example from The D Programming Language. It seems I need to overload cast(bool) instead.
Aug
7
asked Unary negation operator overloading in D
Aug
7
comment assert(false) in D language
assert(0) in D reminds me of C++ exception specifications. A language feature that can easily kill your program, so it should never be used in production code. gotw.ca/publications/mill22.htm
Aug
7
comment assert(false) in D language
I understand that point. But, agree that you can't guarantee that unreachable code will be never reached. You can't prove your program correctness and can't guarantee that a number of bugs is exactly zero. So, why do you want to write a code that will crash the whole program just because something goes wrong? It won't be appreciated by a customer. Especially, if he can lose money due to that crash. There are a lot of options how to handle such situation. For example, you can throw an exception, try to save a stacktrace and send it to developers, warning a user that "system is unstable" etc.
Aug
6
revised assert(false) in D language
added 182 characters in body
Aug
6
comment assert(false) in D language
@ratchet freak: I mean release build. int x=0;assert(x); won't crash the program, but assert(0); will.
Aug
6
comment assert(false) in D language
CyberShadow: It doesn't mean I do not understand the purpose of asserts. The question is about a language design. I just wonder why assert(x) where x is 0 won't crash my program but assert(0) will. Even if something goes completely wrong it doesn't mean that a program shall be immediately crashed.
Aug
6
asked assert(false) in D language
Aug
1
comment Why 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3?
@Anders Abel: Added code examples, but for C++ and Python only. Java and C# are too verbose imho :)
Aug
1
revised Why 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3?
added code examples
Aug
1
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
29
awarded  Good Question
Jul
29
accepted Why 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3?
Jul
29
comment Why 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3?
@LukeH: Thanks! Fixed.
Jul
29
revised Why 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3?
added 254 characters in body