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visits member for 5 years, 2 months
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I love working in: C++, Objective C, C (in that order)
I tolerate working in: Java, PHP
I'm a bit rusty in: C#, Perl

Shells and languages I've not used for a substantial part of a real project don't qualify.

I'm at my best in UNIX-like environments, though I've done Win32 programming in C, and if you'd guessed the C# I wrote ran on Windows, you'd be right.

I believe efficient code is still a virtue. I don't believe in optimizing at the expense of maintainability without just cause, but far too often I see code written that is senselessly inefficient and harder to maintain (or bug-ridden).

Now, to hijack some quotes:

More computing sins are committed in the name of code reuse (without necessarily achieving it) than for any other single reason - including blind stupidity.

Premature abstraction is the root of all evil.

Rules of Abstraction:
Rule 1: Don't do it.
Rule 2 (for experts only): Don't do it yet.


Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
@Michael Thank you! That's the best thing I've read all day!
Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
Why are you (and others) questioning my motivation? I'm simply looking for real-world evidence of a theoretical phenomenon. Is there something deeply wrong with that?
Apr
27
awarded  Student
Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
@Jonathan No, it doesn't measure the effect of inlining specifically, but it does hint at the effect code size can have on performance. The compiler's not magic either, and -Os certainly doesn't, on average, generate faster code than -O3. Compiling all of LAME with -Os, for example, resulted in a measurably slower binary. Compile just the file where profiling revealed it spending most of its time with -O3, and suddenly it's better than when the whole program's built that way. Surely everything else being faster too wouldn't hurt, would it? What conclusion would you draw from this?
Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
@Jonathan I have been able to generate an example where compiling all but one file with -Os (the one file being compiled with -O3) generated measurably faster code than when the whole program was compiled at -O3. This was no contrived example either—it was the LAME mp3 encoder.
Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
Fair enough, but even so I'd expect it to happen occasionally, especially given all the warnings around the 'Net to be careful with the feature.
Apr
27
revised Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
Clarifying I know in _theory_ how inlining can help or hurt
Apr
27
comment Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
I understand all of this, but I've done some searching and I'm not able to find any real examples where inlining has caused enough bloat to be a problem. I can't even find intentionally constructed examples where this happens.
Apr
27
asked Function inlining—what are examples where it hurt performance?
Apr
26
comment Including libcurl in C project
The Mac hides /usr in Finder and the file selector dialog by default, but when you type a '/' in the dialog it gives you a way to open directories it normally won't let you see.
Apr
26
answered Including libcurl in C project
Apr
26
answered munmap_chunk: Assertion `ret == 0' failed
Apr
26
comment Why is “strcat” considered as “unsafe”?
strncat is more standard. strcat_s is a proposed standard, but it's nowhere near universally supported.
Apr
26
comment How to implement Perl hashes in objective-c?
Why can't you use NSMutableDictionary? Your code won't be quite as short as the Perl version, but I believe it can do everything you need. Unfortunately it will also make you wrap your floats in an NSNumber.
Apr
24
answered Problems with portability: aligning data, endianness issues, etc
Apr
24
comment How to allocate memory space without using malloc or new operator?
It's a perfectly reasonable question if you're trying to make someone think, or if you're hiring someone to write a C standard library. Obviously I can't say what happened here, but it's possible the interviewer was more interested in the candidate's thought process than the final answer. In that case, saying, "This is silly, I don't know, and I refuse to try!" isn't going to do you any favors.
Apr
24
comment How to allocate memory space without using malloc or new operator?
What if you need memory backed by a file? How do you get that out of malloc or new?
Apr
24
revised How to allocate memory space without using malloc or new operator?
added 373 characters in body
Apr
24
answered How to allocate memory space without using malloc or new operator?
Apr
21
comment pthread_join leads to segmentation fault. why?
On the explicit cast from void *: if you ever have to compile this with a C++ compiler, you'll just end up throwing the explicit cast back in anyway. It's something worth keeping in mind when making universal declarations that one style is better than another.