265,253 reputation
42372484
bio website
location United Kingdom
age
visits member for 6 years, 3 months
seen 1 hour ago

I am a programmer. My principal language is C++. I've also done commercial work in Java, C, Perl, Python, Javascript and APL. I've also been known to dabble in python, lisp, Haskell, assembler (ARM, x86, amd64) and probably a few other languages that haven't left as big a mark.

I'm a member of the ACCU, and I spoke at accu2012 in April.


Nov
6
revised Why is the output of the following two statements different?
added 135 characters in body
Nov
6
answered Why is the output of the following two statements different?
Nov
6
answered Heap fragmentation and windows memory manager
Nov
5
answered How do I get my git merge conflicts back after merging incorrectly?
Nov
5
comment Should I read the Exceptional C++ books if I've read the Effective C++ series
Perhaps you could explain what your criticisms of the style and focus are, I am interested in your point of view. I found the style engaging and the topics addressed appropriate and relevant. I'm not sure I understood your last sentence at all. Which shop and where should I look for incoherent examples to compare against?
Nov
5
comment Should I read the Exceptional C++ books if I've read the Effective C++ series
You appear to be a little negative towards the benefits of the Exception C++ books and I'd have to disagree. Expectional C++ has far more more that just exception safety and exception safety is far more important than many people appreciate, even for code that doesn't generate many of its own exceptions or directly catch exceptions. Although I don't have the books to hand important topics that are well covered include: object lifetimes, use of iterators, container selection, memory management techniques, benefits and disadvantages of copy-on-write, overload resolution, use of templates.
Nov
5
answered Should I read the Exceptional C++ books if I've read the Effective C++ series
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
4
comment How to Convert Byte* to std::string in C++?
And what about Byte? And more importantly, what does you pointer point to? A single Byte value or an array of Byte? What do you want in your string: a textual representation of the value of the pointer or string that represents the values of the object(s) pointed to?
Nov
4
comment c++: pass function as parameter to another function
@AraK: I was typing as fast as I could...
Nov
4
answered c++: pass function as parameter to another function
Nov
4
comment Indenting Bash Script Output
This isn't going to work with git progress messages as most git progress messages are prefixed with ^M, not a newline, and suffixed with ESC [ K to clear the rest of the line. Piping through sed is going to buffer the output, losing the interactivity of the updates.
Nov
4
answered Indenting Bash Script Output
Nov
4
revised Indenting Bash Script Output
edited tags
Nov
4
answered How to cherry-pick multiple commits
Nov
3
answered How can I print a string to the console at specific coordinates in C++?
Nov
3
answered Using pointers to swap int array values
Nov
2
comment Template specialization problem
OK, that's all right then, I was just knocking up a quick test app to check my sanity. I'd just like to point out that you're missing the keyword struct in quite a few places in your question. Perhaps you'd like to edit to make it a bit more compilable.
Nov
2
answered Template specialization problem
Nov
2
comment What's the difference between std::string and std::basic_string? And why are both needed?
@Jerry Coffin: I agree that specialization doesn't refer to a typedef, but specialization is used to apply to any template specialization, explicitly specialized or not. This is a very common and correct usage of specialization. I don't see how the usage of "specialization" to refer to basic_string<char> is somehow unusual or misleading.