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Aug
13
comment Using std Namespace
@Michael Burr: It may just be my own personal war, but I really do think that the confusing error messages is a significant problem especially for beginners. using namespace std; is frequently sold as an aid to beginners and yet I've often seen instances where it has cause reams of confusing errors.
Aug
12
comment Using std Namespace
@Martin York: Updated with examples illustrating scoping rules. @Michael Burr: That's arguably not so bad, what I really don't like is where the error messages for simple mistakes get a lot harder to interpret, or where they don't happen at all. For example, if a function is believed to be in scope, but isn't and a std:: function is, rather than getting a helpful 'identifier not recognized' error you often end up with a more obscure 'can't convert argument X' or 'unable to generate function from template' style error. Worse is if a wrong function gets called silently. It's rare, but happens.
Aug
12
revised Using std Namespace
Added examples of an unwanted name clash; added 5 characters in body
Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
12
answered How can I achieve traceability in a git server-repository?
Aug
12
comment What could be a reason to not use bracket classes in C++?
Technically an object should have an address even if its size 0 bytes, however if nobody takes its address a compiler can (and will) not perform any instruction to allocate storage for it and just call the destructor (or even add inline code for the destructor) at the points where the 'object' would be destroyed.
Aug
12
answered Can I associate ssh username with commit with git over ssh?
Aug
12
answered What is activation record in the context of C and C++?
Aug
12
comment What could be a reason to not use bracket classes in C++?
@Phil Nash: I agree, I was trying to find an example of something the countered the "writing a new class is a fair amount of overhead" point and shared_ptr abuse sprang to mind first.
Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
12
revised Reason why not to have a DELETE macro for C++
added 18 characters in body
Aug
12
comment What could be a reason to not use bracket classes in C++?
Look at the link. shared_ptr can take a custom deleter. You can (ab)use it (and perhaps bind) to "delete" a void pointer by executing an arbritary function. On leaving a block scope, the custom deleter will be called.
Aug
12
revised What could be a reason to not use bracket classes in C++?
added 322 characters in body
Aug
12
answered What could be a reason to not use bracket classes in C++?
Aug
12
revised How to count total lines changed by a specific author in a Git repository?
added 300 characters in body; added 23 characters in body
Aug
12
answered Reason why not to have a DELETE macro for C++
Aug
12
comment Using std Namespace
A specialization of std::swap would be a complete specialization - you can't partially specialize function templates. Any program is allowed to partially specialize any standard library template so long as that specialization depends on a user-defined type.
Aug
12
answered How to count total lines changed by a specific author in a Git repository?
Aug
12
comment How to count total lines changed by a specific author in a Git repository?
I tried blame, but it didn't really give the stats I thought the OP would need?
Aug
12
comment Using std Namespace
using namespace std; imports the contents of the std namespace into the global namespace. It doesn't change the default namespace. Defining something in the global namespace after a using namespace std won't magically put it into the std namespace.