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seen Sep 14 at 2:31

Sep
7
comment Free private SVN repository + document hosting
FYI - Indefero no longer offers source code hosting but they have made their platform free/open source ( projects.ceondo.com/p/indefero ). It's pretty easy to setup in a VM - I wouldn't recommend using it on shared hosting though. <shameless plug>I have personally forked it and made many improvements in SQL and usability (indefero starts to drag after about 10 repos and they aren't accepting diffs) you can see and download it here - srchub.org - you can also request a free repo for SVN/hg/git.</shameless plug>
May
9
comment Defining the character encoding of a JavaScript source file
Or what if you aren't using a web server and running HTML files locally?
Apr
22
comment Embed Google PhotoSphere (gapi.panoembed) using image NOT hosted on Google servers
FYI - I don't think they support this anymore: developers.google.com/photo-sphere/web
Nov
26
comment How are ssl certificates verified?
I love this comment - unfortunately it highlights a very important weakness with CAs. Let's say you import a CA cert from Bob Smith - well Bob Smith can sign a certificate for any domain (including google.com and chase.com). This is actually why GoDaddy/Verisign pay big money to be included in the OS - they are vetted by a security outfit to ensure that they have checks in place to make sure they don't sign a cert for a malicious person. I think that you should be able to say "this CA can only sign certs for mysite.com".
Oct
16
comment Why does the 260 character path length limit exist in Windows?
@Mas The "fix" you want was done all the back to Windows XP. Calling the unicode version of their API will allow you to access the "extended path". I believe explorer automatically handles this. Here is one such function that supports it - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… .
Oct
14
comment When assert() fails, what is the program exit code?
Compilers don't always follow the standard to the T. (I'm looking at you Microsoft) While it is good to know what the standard says - it's also equally as good to know what compilers really do. What they should do isn't always what they actually do. That and the standard isn't actually free.
Sep
29
comment C++ Passing a Copy of an Object vs. Passing a Pointer to an Object?
I do want to comment that this could be dangerous (which is why vector actually makes a copy of the object vs taking in a reference when you call push_back) - example gist.github.com/nadams810/6756139. That code works just fine on VC++/gcc...but that's just by random luck as the destructor was called for CC so x should no longer be usable. I'm not saying you should or shouldn't use it - just be mindful of the scope of what you are passing around.
Sep
22
comment Catching access violation exceptions?
This does NOT work in gcc but does work in VC++ but only in the "Debug" build. Still upvoting for an interesting solution. The signal handler would be called but the exception won't get thrown.
Sep
16
comment Why is it a bad idea to use 'new'?
"The most important thing to realize when coming to C++ from another OO language is that most objects only ever need to have automatic lifetime, and thus there is never anything to worry about." I agree with "most". If you are writing a library or engine - I would imagine a good use case for longer object life. One may argue that you could just return a copy of the object - but I really think that's a waste.
Sep
16
comment Why should C++ programmers minimize use of operator 'new'?
I think a better answer is that the smart_ptr will leak if an exception is called and nothing catches it.
Sep
16
comment Declaring an object before initializing it in c++
This needs to be changed to auto_ptr<Animal> p_a(new Animal); otherwise the auto_ptr just has a null pointer. Though I like the second idea as it doesn't copy it - but you do have to be mindful that the life is in that scope.
Sep
15
comment shared_ptr<void> t(new char[num]) means memory leak?
Using shared_ptr<void> is not undefined behavior - stackoverflow.com/questions/7881003/… - it's use is also encouraged - boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/smart_ptr/…
Sep
14
comment How to handle or avoid a stack overflow in C++
I don't think that that would work. It would be better to push/pop esp than move to a register because you don't know if the compiler will decide to use eax for something.
Sep
14
comment overloading new/delete
"Why is it whenever someone try's to use a less common feature of C++, someone acts like it should never be done?" I find it's a kneejerk reaction by people who are inexperienced. For example they read in some blog post using raw pointers is bad, using smart pointers makes you cool. So anyone using raw pointers (even if they have to due to the hardware limitations of the system) are wrong.
Sep
14
comment overloading new/delete
"Why did you not file a bug and instead chose to play with fire?" If you ever had to work with a vendor you would know the answer to that question. Some are better than others, some would just say "thanks for the bug report - it will be fixed in the next version - oh by the way your license doesn't cover the next version..." Some may even go so far as to say "it's not a bug, it's a feature" as was stated by @T.E.D.
Sep
13
comment Why do C++ libraries and frameworks never use smart pointers?
Would you consider Doom 3 engines to be a "nontrivial program"? If so - you better call John Carmack and let him know that there are bugs in his engine. Also people, like John Carmack (and/or his team) have already figured out how to debug heap issues - github.com/TTimo/doom3.gpl/blob/… . Arguably anything heap related should have some debug counter built in. But then there are tools such as valgrind, Dr. Memory etc - using a smart pointer doesn't mean that a memory leak won't happen it's just less likely.
Sep
12
comment Why do C++ libraries and frameworks never use smart pointers?
"Non-library code should, however, generally prefer smart pointers over raw." I think this should be the deciding factor. For those that are like "well how do you know the lifetime of the pointers?" That's called documentation and comments - the same way it's been done for years.
Sep
12
comment Quickly create large file on a windows system?
They are built into Windows which is what the OP asked for (assuming your system is fully up to date).
Sep
12
comment Quickly create large file on a windows system?
Installing Python to solve one problem is really overkill. Why not just use something built in such as Powershell or C# - gist.github.com/nadams810/6539070 (you don't even need Visual Studio to compile C# applications).
Sep
9
comment Where can I find a good VCS written in PHP?
"pthreads is an Object Orientated API that allows user-land multi-threading in PHP." php.net/manual/en/intro.pthreads.php .